Spine has title
History
of
William Blackstone
and
Stephen Foot Blackstone


[There is no T. B. Blackstone anywhere in this book except here as the frontispiece. The only explanation is that John W. Blackstone's cousin was a philanthropist and perhaps donated money for publication of this book, despite his line not being included.]


LINEAGE AND HISTORY

OF

WILLIAM BLACKSTONE,

FIRST SETTLER OF BOSTON, AND OF HIS DESCENDANTS,
FROM HIS BIRTH--1595, TO THE CLOSE OF THE
REVOLUTION--1783, WITH A CONTINUATION IN
THE LINE OF STEPHEN FOOT BLACK-
STONE, GREAT, GREAT, GRANDSON OF
WILLIAM, DOWN TO THIS DATE.

BY

John Wilford Blackstone,

Minneapolis, Minn.




PUBLISHED BY
JOHN WILFORD BLACKSTONE JR.
FREDERIC, WIS.
1907.



TO

HENRY ROGERS

OF

NEW HAVEN, CONN.,
MY GRANDFATHER'S FRIEND, THIS BOOK
IS MOST RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED
John Wilford Blackstone.




FAMILY CHAT.

When a author essays biography he should have all his materials well in hand before he begins. He can then select, arrange, balance and polish until some measure of literary charm shall embellish and adorn his recital.

In the history of William Blackstone in this work, the writer has followed closely the life of Blackstone as given in Mr. Daggett's work on Attleborough, R.I. (1892). While that writer deprecates the want of continuity in his sketch, owing to the interpolation of new matter as his work proceeded, the form as given in this work, has rather added to, than removed the cause of criticism.

The real burden of biography is to lay bare character. The words, writings, deeds and the human relations of the person are the working tools of the biographer. Daggett has been industrious in equipping himself.

Let the reader then content himself, if the facts as given by Mr. Daggett shall show William Blackstone rather than Roger Williams to be the true prototype of religious freedom in America. Aside from all other things there is apparent, such as an earnest spirit of sympathy in Mr. Daggett’s work, that we are carried happily along with him though historical vistas are sometimes interrupted, and staid Clio sometimes retires behind the wings, while smiling Thalia trips before the footlights to beguile the listener with romantic fancies and rose tinted legends.

Deep as is the indebtedness to Mr. Daggett, and to those to whom he has given credit, in the literary part of this book, in the genealogical part, the credit due to Mr. Henry Rogers of New Haven, Conn. is simply expressed, by saying, without him it could not have been done. That there should be errors in a work like this goes without saying.

The great lapse of time--the discrepances between town, church and tombstone records, make absolute certainty impossible.

If an undue prominence shall seem to be given to the nearer relatives of the writer, the apology lies in the fact that he has spent his three score years and ten in their closer communion, and that his family has been written up in local records for many years.

Hoping that this work of love and pride will be a right incentive to all who bear the Blackstone blood, and that some of our ancestors may have received justice long overdue, I bid all the clan Hail and Farewell.

The Author.



[This is a copy of the original Book, written by John Wilford Blackstone. There maybe possible errors in copying and is for reference only, and not to be used for profit. The primary transcriber is David Beck.]

A brief genealogy to show which John Wilford Blackstone we are talking about having written the book and who published it:

Rev. William BLACKSTONE
b. 5 Mar 1595, Horncastle, Lincoln, England
d. 26 May 1675, Pawtucket River, Rehoboth, MA
& Sarah FISHER
b. 1625, Durham, England
d. Jun 1673, Rehoboth, MA
m. 4 Jul 1659, By Governor Of Massachusetts
| John BLACKSTONE
| b. 1660, Attleborough, Bristol, MA
| d. 1743, Branford, New Haven, CT
| & Katherine GORHAM
| b. 1657/1670, Of Providence, RI
| d. 1723, Branford, New Haven, CT
| m. 1690, Providence, RI
| | John BLACKSTONE Jr., Captain
| | b. 18 Jul 1699, Providence, Providence, RI
| | d. 3 Jan 1785, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | & Elisabeth FOOTE
| | b. 10 Nov 1709, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | d. 14 May 1733, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | m. 2 Apr 1727, Providence, Providence, RI
| | | John BLACKSTONE III (Jr.)
| | | b. 7 May 1733, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | | d. 10 Aug 1818, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | | & Rebecca BALDWIN
| | | b. 20 May 1734, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | | d. 25 Aug 1799, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | | m. 19 May 1757, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | | | Stephen Foot BLACKSTONE
| | | | b. 26 Oct 1772, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | | | d. 14 Jun 1862, White Oak Springs, Lafayette, WI
| | | | & Anna WILFORD
| | | | b. 24 Apr 1767, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | | | d. 7 Mar 1813, Madison, Madison, NY
| | | | m. 23 Jan 1793, Branford, New Haven, CT
| | | | | John Wilford BLACKSTONE Sr., Judge
THE TITLE PAGE WOULD LEAVE A PERSON TO CONCLUDE THIS IS THE COLLECTOR OF THE DATA FOR THE BOOK.

| | | | | b. 18 Oct 1796, Madison, Madison, NY
| | | | | d. 15 Oct 1868, White Oak Springs, Lafayette, WI
| | | | | & Katherine TOMLINSON
| | | | | b. 26 Dec 1806, Rockingham, NC
| | | | | d. 18 Oct 1865, White Oak Springs, Lafayette, WI
| | | | | m. 4 Apr 1833, Galena, Jo Daviess, IL
| | | | | | John Wilford BLACKSTONE Jr.
THIS IS THE NAME ON THE TITLE PAGE AS PUBLISHER.

| | | | | | b. 22 Dec 1835, White Oak Springs, Lafayette, WI
| | | | | | d. 29 Dec 1890
| | | | | | & Ellen E. HARDY
| | | | | | b. 28 Oct 1843, Platteville, Grant, WI
| | | | | | m. 20 Jun 1861
| | | | | | | John Wilford BLACKSTONE III
HE WAS A NEWSPAPER PUBLISHER AND ACCORDING TO HIS NIECE HE PUBLISHED THE BOOK.

| | | | | | | b. 29 Oct 1870, White Oak Springs, Lafayette, WI
| | | | | | | d. 28 Dec 1952, Freeport, Stevenson, IL
| | | | | | | & Isabelle A. BLACKSTONE
| | | | | | | b. 2 Nov 1874, Chapin, Franklin, Iowa
| | | | | | | d. aft 28 Dec 1952, Freeport, IL
| | | | | | | m. 24 Jul 1900, Apple River, IL
| | | | | | | Ralph Hardy BLACKSTONE
| | | | | | | b. 16 Apr 1880, Shullsburg, Lafayette, WI
| | | | | | | d. 26 Feb 1956, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN
| | | | | | | & Jessie DODGE
| | | | | | | b. 20 Feb 1886, Shullsburg, Lafayette, WI
| | | | | | | d. 12 Jan 1946, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN
| | | | | | | | John Wilford BLACKSTONE IV
NEPHEW OF THE PUBLISHER.
| | | | | | | | b. 1914, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN
| | | | | | | | d. 11 Aug 1988, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN
| | | | | | | | & Jean Margart KLINGENSMITH
| | | | | | | | b. 5 Dec 1918, SD
| | | | | | | | m. 1 Jul 1939, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN
| | | | | | | | Anne Ellen BLACKSTONE
THIS COUSIN TOLD JIM DANGEL THAT HER UNCLE PUBLISHED THE BOOK.

| | | | | | | | b. 17 Jul 1916, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN
| | | | | | | | & Donald Elmer PETERSON
| | | | | | | | b. 25 Dec 1911, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN
| | | | | | | | d. 8 Sep 1987, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN
| | | | | | | | m. 5 Jun 1937, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN


PART 1.


Lineage and history of William Blackstone of Boston and of his descendants, from the date of his birth--1595 to the close of the Revolution--1783.



1st Generation William
Blackstone


William Blackstone born 1595
died May 26, 1675
Sarah Stevenson, Widow born
died June 1678
Married June 4, 1659
Children
John Blackstone born about 1661



2nd Generation William
Blackstone John


John Blackstone born about 1661
died
Catherine born
died
Married about 1692
Children
John Blackstone born Jan 18, 1699



LINEAGE OF
ELIZABETH (FOOT) BLACKSTONE




1st Generation Nathaniel
Foot


Nathaniel Foot born 1593
died 1644
Elizabeth Deming born July 28, 1595
died July 28, 1683
Married 1615
Children
Nathaniel Foot born 1620
Robert 1629
Elizabeth 1616
Mary 1623
Frances 1629
Sarah 1632
Rebecca 1634



2nd Generation Nathaniel
Foot Robert


Robert Foot born 1629
died 1681
Sarah born
died
Married 1659
Children
Nathaniel Foot born April 13, 1660
Sarah Feb. 12, 1662
Elizabeth March 8, 1664
Joseph March 6, 1666
Samuel May 14, 1668
John July 24, 1670
Stephen (twins) Dec. 14, 1672
Isaac (twins) Dec. 14, 1672



3rd Generation Nathaniel
Foot Robert
Stephen
Edward

Stephen Foot born Dec. 14, 1672
died Oct. 25, 1762
Elizabeth Nash born Jan. 15, 1680
Daughter of John Nash
died Jan. 15, 1739
Married 1705
Children
Sarah Foot born Oct. 4, 1706
Elizabeth Nov. 19, 1709
Lydia Sept. 1, 1712
Mary Sept. 27, 1715
Rebecca 1723



3rd Generation William
Blackstone John
John



John Blackstone born July 18, 1699
died Jan. 3,1785
Elizabeth Foot born Nov. 19, 1709
died May 12, 1733
Married April 2, 1727
Children
John Blackstone Jr. born May, 1733
Abigail April 29, 1728
Elizabeth Dec. 12, 1731
Stephen (single) Feb. 15, 1729



LINEAGE OF REBECCA (BALDWIN) BLACKSTONE




1st Generation William
Hoadley


William Hoadley born 1630
died 1709
1st Wife Unknown born
2nd Mary Farrington died May12, 1703
3rd Ruth Frisbie died April 26, 1736
Married Mary Farrington, 1686
Children, 1st marriage:
William Hoadley born
Samuel 1662
John
Mary
Elizabeth baptized Feb. 1668
Hannah baptized Nov. 1790
Abraham



2nd Generation William
Hoadley Samuel


Samuel Hoadley born 1662
died 1714

Abigail Farrington born April 30, 1668
died Feb. 26, 1745
Married Mar. 6, 1689
Children
Abigail Hoadley born Jan. 5, 1690
William Dec. 10, 1692
Hannah Dec. 16, 1694
Samuel Feb. 20, 1696
Gideon April 17, 1699
Lydia Dec. 23, 1701
Benjamin July 24, 1704
Daniel Dec. 9, 1706
Timothy July 14, 1709



3rd Generation William
Hoadley Samuel
Abigail


Abigail Hoadley born Jan. 5, 1690
died
Joseph Frisbie born 1688
died
Married Dec. 5, 1711
Children
Rebecca Frisbie born 1712



4th Generation William
Hoadley Samuel
Frisbie Abigail
Rebecca Frisbie


Rebecca Frisbie born 1712
died 1806
Noah Baldwin born March 20, 1710
died Nov. 20, 1799
Married March 21, 1733
Children
Rebecca Baldwin born May 20, 1734
Noah Nov. 18, 1738
Ebenezer Sept. 28, 1741
Lucy Feb. , 1744
Lydia
Abigail Dec. 15, 1749



1st Generation Edward
Frisbie


Edward Frisbie born
died
Abigail born
died
Married 1649
Children
John Frisbie born 1650
Edward 1652
Benoni 1656
Samuel 1654
Jonathan 1659
Caleb 1653
Hannah
Josiah
Ebenezer twins 1672
Silence twins 1672



2nd Generation Edward
Frisbie John


John Frisbie born 1650
died
Ruth Bowers born
died
Married Dec. 2, 1674
Children
John Frisbie born 1676
Edward 1677
Rebecca 1679
Hannah 1681
Samuel 1683
Ruth 1685
Joseph baptized 1688
Mary born
Lydia



3rd Generation Edward
Frisbie John
Joseph

Joseph Frisbie born 1688
died
Abigail Hoadley born Jan. 5, 1690
died
Married Dec. 5, 1711
Children
Rebecca Frisbie born 1712



4th Generation Edward
Frisbie John
Joseph
Rebecca


Rebecca Frisbie born 1712
died 1806
Noah Baldwin born March 20, 1710
died Nov. 23, 1799
Married March 21, 1733
Children
Rebecca Baldwin born May 20, 1734
Noah Nov. 18, 1738
Ebenezer Sept. 28, 1741
Lucy Feb., 1744
Lydia
Abigail Dec. 15, 1749



1st Generation John
Baldwin


John Baldwin born
died
1st Wife, Mary
2nd Wife, Mary Bruen
Married
Children, 1st marriage:
John Baldwin born 1640
Joseph 1642
Samuel 1645
Nathaniel 1648
Elizabeth 1649
Joseph 1651
Children, 2nd marriage:
Mary Baldwin born Sept. 1654
Sarah Dec. 25, 1655
Abigail Nov. 15, 1658
Obediah Oct. 1660
George so said 1662
Hannah 1663
Richard June, 1665



2nd Generation John
Baldwin George


George Baldwin born 1662
died Oct. 28, 1728
Deborah Rose
Daughter of Robert Rose.
died
Married
Children
John Baldwin born June 30, 1690
Phoebe Nov. 7, 1692
Israel Dec. 13, 1694
Elizabeth Dec. 20, 1697
Deborah Dec. 27, 1699
Martha Jan. 13, 1702
Daniel July 1, 1705
Rebecca Oct. 28, 1707
Noah March 20, 1710
Tillah 1712



3rd Generation John
Baldwin George
Noah


Noah Baldwin born March 20, 1710
died Nov. 23, 1799
Rebecca Frisbie born 1712
died 1806
Married March 21, 1733
Children
Rebecca Baldwin born May 20, 1734
Noah Nov. 18, 1738
Ebenezer Sept. 28, 1741
Lucy Feb, 1744
Lydia
Abigail Dec. 12, 1749



4th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.


John Blackstone Jr. born May, 1733
died Aug. 18, 1818
Rebecca Baldwin born May 20, 1734
died Aug. 18, 1799
Married May 19, 1757
Children
Ann Blackstone born Oct. 14, 1759
John April 24, 1763
Timothy Nov. 7, 1765
Abigail July 10, 1768
Edward Sept. 2, 1770
Stephen Foot Dec. 3, 1772
Ebenezer June 25, 1775
Ralph July 5, 1778



HISTORY OF
William Blackstone of Boston, From his birth--
1595, and of his descendants to the close of the
Revolution--1783.


WILLIAM BLACKSTONE.



The name Blackstone is a Historical one, both in England and in this Country.

There is on the border of England and Scotland a range of hills called Blackstone Hills. They are no doubt so named from the color of the rocks and cliffs which are found there. While William Blackstone and his descendants have given the name to many natural objects and numerous artificial one as well in these modern times, the rule in ancient times was reversed. The family or clan owning and occupying the Blackstone Hills, would be known as John or Charles of Blackstone. In time the preposition would be dropped and the family would take the surname Blackstone. We thus determine among many forms, the true spelling of the name, and the form Blackstone will be used in this sketch except where records are copied in which other forms are used. Recent research have located the seat and great Estates of the Baron of Blackstone in the county of Durham in the north of England.

William Blackstone the subject of this sketch was the first settler within the limits of Attleborough, in the Colony of Plymouth. His name has become celebrated wherever the early history of the New England is known. He was a man of many peculiarities and of singular history. He was also the first settler and sole proprietor of Shawmut, now the site of the great city of Boston. There are two or three more individuals at a distance on Marerick and Thompson Island in Boston Harbor, apparently having no connection with him. Everything relating to the unique life of this eccentric though amiable man, must be interesting to all who feel an interest in the ancient history of the colony.

He came to this country from England soon after the Pilgrim Fathers as early as 1625 - 1626, though some place the date at 1623, and settled first in Boston called by the Indians Shawmut meaning a spring of water. Here, he commenced his solitary life, built his home, cultivated his land and planted the orchard where the first apples in Massachusetts were grown. He had undoubtedly occupied the peninsula several years and alone before the arrival of Governor Winthrop and company in 1630.

Sir Ferdinand Gorges, whose son had the original grant of Mass. Colony, being ten miles along Mass. Bay and extending inland thirty miles, was largely interested in lands futher north. Being anxious to develop these grants he induced his son to relinquish the Mass. Charter which he did, about 1628. In 1629 all of Mass. Except Plymouth Colony, extending back to the western ocean was granted to Winthrop and his Associated. It was without doubt from this son that William Blackstone obtained his grant of eight hundred acres of land at Shawmut, though he claimed also by possession and occupancy.

John Blackstone a Member of Parliament appear to have taken an active part and interest in the infant Colonies. He was one of the Parliament committee for the Colonies and in 1642 he invited Cotton, Hooker and Davenport to come to England for consultation on the States of the Realm. As one of the Council he joined in power to William Blackstone to deliver Seisin under one of its patents. That there was relationship between them is now admitted and John's position in Parliament may have led William to take up his residence in New England. He probably aided in enforcing William's claim to Shawmut under Gorges and caused Winthrop to pay him for at least a small part of it. If William owned the whole peninsula of eight hundred acres as Amory asserts, the greed and injustice of Winthrop and his followers are very manifies. Winthrop and his followers first located themselves at Charlestown. They found the water there bad, many sick and some died. Blackstone in kindness of heart, invited them to his side of the Charles River where there was plenty of good water. History shows how this generosity was requited.

Mr. Blackstone had been in England, trained for the Established Church, whether he ever took orders is not shown by any known records. He was a well educated man and received his degree from Emanuel College, Cambridge - Bachelor of Arts in 1617, and master in 1621. What was the special reason for his leaving his own country and coming here is not wholly known.

This effort to trace William Blackstone to his birth place or any home in his native country were long without results, for the name is not a common one in England. He lived however in a age of Religious bigotry and persecution and not being able as he said to endure the power of the Lord Bishops he left his native land and sought an asylum in the wilds of America, where he might enjoy his own opinion unmolested. The peninsula was called Blackstone Neck and as first occupants he claimed the whole as his property. After residing a few years with the settlers of Shawmut he found there was the same intolerant and overbearing spirit among those new Associates. They attempted to eject him from his land under pretence that they were entitled to them under grant from the English King. Mr. Blackstone declined to have his right taken from him even by a Sceptered Hand, saying in his independent and characteristic way; The King asserteth Sovereignty of this New England because John and Sebastian Cabot sailed along the coast, without landing anywhere; and if the quality of Sovereignty can subsist upon mere inspection, surely the quality of property can subsist upon actual occupancy, which is the foundation of my claim. Becoming thus naturally discontented with the power of the Lord Brethren he felt compelled to seek another retreat. His claim was recognized by Winthrop and his followers to the extent of fifty acres, which they purchased and six acres which included his garden, orchard and dwelling, they generously permitted him to retain Amory says twenty areas. - This property is said to have been sold by Blackstone to Sir Henry Vane, who was governor in 1636. He soon returned to England, became prominent during the commonwealth and lost his head after the restoration. According to Prince Chronicles his house stood on the south side of Charles River Mouth, on a point of land called Blackstone Point and near a spring. Mr. Blackstone must have been a man of substances, for in 1628, his share of the levy to defray the expense of the Campaign against Morton at Merry Mount was twelve shillings, a large sum for those days, which though the smallest of several levies made, was more than a third of that of the whole town of Salem.

With the purchase money for his lands he bought a stock of cows which he took with him when he removed to his new settlement on Pawtucket River. Instead of contending with enemies he fled from their society and persecution. It was in 1634 that he sold his right and tittle in the peninsula to the inhabitants of Boston, each one paying six shillings or more. The following documents in Shaws History of Boston gives some of the particulars of the purchases. The deposition of John Odlyn age 82, Robert Walker age 78, Francis Hudson about 66 and William Lytherland age 76. These deponents being dwellers and inhabitants of the Town of Boston from the time of the first planting thereof, do jointly testify and deposed that on or about the year of our Lord 1634 the inhabitants of said town of whom the Hon. John Winthrop Esq, Governor of the colony was Chief, did treat and agree with Mr. Wm. Blackstone for the purchase of his estate and right in any land lying within said neck of land called Boston and for said purchase agreed. That every householder should pay six shillings which was accordingly collected none paying less, some considerably more and the said sum was paid to Mr. Blackstone to his full content. Reserving to himself about six acres on the Point commonly called Blackstone Point on part where of his then dwelling house stood. After which purchased the town laid out a training field which ever since and now is for that purpose and feeding cattle Mr. Blackstone received thirty pounds for his right to the peninsula as will appear by the following records "The tenth day of the ninth month 1634 voted that a rate be made namely – a rate for thirty pounds to Mr. Blackstone". Reckoning March the first Month, this assessment was made in November. The purchase was of course made at a previous date, and Blackstone in all probability removed the subsequent spring. We can hardly conceive the difficulties of such a journey at that time. No highways opened a pathway for him and the Indian paths led in a different direction. No signpost pointed a guiding finger to the traveler. He must find his way and guide his wayward cattle and transport his household goods. It was successfully accomplished. He had resided a Shawmut ten years. One Lechford, an Englishman who visited America in 1637, and published his writings in London in 1641 says: " One master Blackstone, a Minister, went from Boston, having lived there for nine or ten years. He lived near Master Williams but is far from his opinion" in 1635 then he removed about thirty-five miles to another retreat still farther in the wilderness. This place was on the banks of the Pawtucket River, which is now called Blackstone River, and his lands were on the East Side of the river and adjoined it. It was within the ancient limits of Attleborough in that part called the "Gore" from its shape, now Cumberland, Rhode Island.

Blackstone never lived in Rhode Island. After his removal from Boston he located, lived and died within the territory of Plymouth, or old Colony. The boundaries are now different from what they were when he lived and died. Cumberland was not set off to Rhode Island until 1747 more than one hundred and ten years after he located in Rehoboth, North purchase. It was seventy years after his death before the change was made in the lines between the two states. The Pawtucket River was the boundary between the two Colonies and Blackstone was on the east side of it. The territory which he occupied, and cultivated and which contained his grave was in Massachusetts.

The time of his settlement, 1635 was about ten years before the settlement of Rehoboth and a few years before that of Providence, for it was not until 1636 that Rodger William first came to Seakonk. This place being within the limits of Mass. Governor Winthrop invited him to move across the water, and he went to the place which was later Providence.

Deep in the primeval forest at the crossing place of the river, among people untamed as the game they hunted, Blackstone found a congenial home and knew the "Pleasure in the pathless woods". Here he built himself a home surrounded by a garden and an orchard. Both surrounded by a native park for his daily walk. He laid out his field. Here native fountains quenched his thirst, here he tended his flocks. Here his studious soul read the great book of nature spread out around him, or caught again the inspiration of Roman and Grecian refinement and culture from the volumes which with unchanged friendship and fidelity, made his lonely cabin seem filled with smiling friends. Here he lived for forty years, here was buried and has slept in the silence of the grave for more than two hundred years. His dwelling which he called "Study Hall" was a few rods from the bank of the river near the hill which ascended by a gentle slope, and his orchard was just east of the hill. This he called "Study Hill" a name it long retained. The place is about three miles above Pawtucket in the present town of Donsdale, where the late Simon Whipple resided. The Indian name of the place was "Waurvepoonseaq" – the place of nets or snares – "Waurvee" meaning a goose. The name is mentioned in Plymouth records, in describing the boundary of the North Purchased in 1661 from Rehoboth, ranging upon the Pawtucket River to a place where our Blackstone now sojourneth called by the natives "Waurvepoonseag". His title to the lands he occupied was respected by the Plymouth Government. According to the Old Colony Records, " On March 5, 1671, Mr. Stephen Paine Sen. of Rehoboth and Mr. Nicholas Tanner were appointed by the court to see Mr. Blackstone’s land laid forth according to the grant." After his death the government ordered them recorded to him.

For many years Mr. Blackstone must have lived in complete isolation and seclusion, for his dwelling was far from the haunts of his fellow man. Stray Indians may have visited him in their hunting and fishing excursions but beyond this he was perhaps companionless. He certainly tasted the benefits – if such there be – of a solitary life. At last because perhaps of approaching age, but more probably because he was true to the instinct of our nature, and the dictates of the human heart, he decided "that is not good for man to be alone" and he sighted for someone to enjoy the solitude with him. What soft persuasion he whispered in the ear of Sarah Stevenson which induced her to forsake the society of relative and friends in Boston to become the constant companion of the "sage of the wilderness" history has not revealed. Ancient records have told us that they were married July 4, 1659, by John Endicott, Governor. She came from the same district in England as Blackstone and they were probably acquainted there. Blackstone’s lonely dwelling was thus cheered and enlivened by the presence of woman, and one son was the fruit of the union. The life if retired, and far from such markets as the town afforded was not necessarily unvaried or frugal. Milk and meat were obtained from the herd, fish from the river, game from the forest, and these with the grain, fruit and vegetables from the garden and orchard and fields afforded varied and abundant food. Mrs. Stevenson was the widow of John Stevenson of Boston. She had by him three son’s – Quesimus born 26th, 10th month 1643; John born 7th, month 1645; James born Oct. 1, 1653.

The second son of John Stevenson lived with his mother after her marriage with Mr. Blackstone, and after their death continued at the same place during the rest of his life.

Mrs. Blackstone died June 1673. The following is found in the Rehoboth records – "Mrs. Sarah Blackstone the wife of William Blaxton was buried about the middle of June 1673. Many of the ancient records mention the day of the burial but not that of death.

Mr. Blackston survived his wife only about two years, and died May 26, 1675 a few weeks before the commencement of the great Indian War, thus having escaped witnessing the horrors of that awful period, and the complete destruction of his "fair domain". He was always on friendly terms with the Indians. Miantonons, the nephew of Canonicus – Massasoit, King of the Wampanoage – Conouicus and King Philip were friends, and through his influence they remained peaceable. He was of the age of four score at the time of his death, and the record on the Rehoboth book of his burial is "Mr. William Blaxton buried the 28th of May 1675. The name has been written in many ways. Blaxton is the form he chose. As written now it has been so much used, and has become so fixed in the record of the country that it would be inexpedient to change it and the modern orthography is not only correct but the most agreeable.

Blackstone had lived in New England about fifty years. Ten at Shawmut and forty at Attleborough. He was quite advanced in years. A brief notice of his death furnished by his friend Roger Williams, at the date of June 13, 1673 is in these words – "about a fortnight since your old acquaintance Mr. Blackstone departed this life in the four score year of his age. Four days before his death, he had a great pain in his breast and back and bowels. Afterwards he said he was well – had no pain and should live; but he grew fainter and yielded up his breath without a groan". Thus perished the "Patriarch of the wilderness". Around him was still the wilderness when death snatched him from the sylvan retreat which he loved; though the footsteps of men were fast approaching. How would he be astonished to behold the region around it. The place which he thought secure from the haunts of men, is now swarming with a Industrious and thriving population. How would he grieve to find the stream whose placid water as they flowed by his dwelling, he delighted to contemplate now interrupted by numerous water works, and the silence which then surrounded him disturbed by the whirring of thousands of spindles. To what ignoble use is his classic stream now devoted? What a contrast! It is a change which the peace-loving spirit of Blackstone could not endure. Did he seek for solitude today, he must drive his herd for many a weary mile, --- beyond the "Great Lakes" – over the "Father of Water" never resting till he reached the wilds of the "Rocky Mountains" or some spot in the "Great Deserts" of the West.

Mr. Blackstone left considerable property, as will be seen by the following inventory taken May 28, 1675, "This was taken but two days after his death" says Mr. Bliss in his History of Rehoboth, "and was a common practice owing to the conditions of the times.

Sixty acres of land and two shares of Meadows in Providence

The West Plain,

The South Neck,

Land about the house and orchard amounting to two hundred acres.

The Meadow called Blackstone’s Meadow.

Personal Property


3 bibles 10s., 6 English books in folios £2 ------------------------ £2 15s.
3 Latin books in folios 15s., 3 do large quarto £2 ------------ £2 15s.
15 small quarto £1 17s. 6d., 14 small do 14s. ------------------- £2 31s. 6d.
30 large octavo £4, small do £1 5s. ------------------------------- £5 5s.
22 duodecimo ------------------------------------------------------------- £1 13s.
53 small of little value --------------------------------------------------- 13s.
10 paper books ----------------------------------------------------------- 5s.
Other personal property ------------------------------------------------- £15 12s 6d.
------------------------
Total ---------------------- £56 3s 6d.

"This estate (the movables) was destroyed and carried away by the natives" says a marginal note on the Plymouth Colony Records. This Library contained one hundred and eighty-four volumes, certainly a large library to be in the possession of a private gentlemen of that day in the wilds of America. The Historians will always painfully regret the destruction of those paper books. These were no doubt manuscripts writing of this student and thinker himself. If there were among them which is probable, a journal of events as they occurred both in England and America, as viewed by this original genius, no sigh or regret of the historians will measure the loss. Would it be too much to say that regret should be equaled by the odium resting on the names of the indifferent guardians who permitted the destruction.

Such a journal might have revealed the mystery of his strange residence in the New World.

How interesting is the mere inventory of those volumes the associates of his retirement, the joy and solace of his long life. We know that his was a mind and spirit that could not brook the Tyranny of Men, but caused other than those known, contributed to his removal to this country will always perhaps be a profound secret. We can hardly imagine what strong influence there was which could have moved him to forsake his home and all his kindred without hope of meeting again. What could have induced such a man with his tastes and pursuits to leave the halls of learning and the cultivated society of old England to become a hermit in the wilds of America?

He was by no means a misanthrope but a man of benevolence who took this mode of indulging in his love for solitude, and of securing the unrestrained enjoyment of his sentiments and tastes. He did not shun man because he hated him, but because he loved solitude more than society. He was fond of study and contemplation and here he could enjoy both. His independent mind and character held nothing in common with the dog-matical and persecuting spirit of his age, and he determined to escape the presence and influence and avoid the theological controversies of the days. He was not idle though alone. He cultivated his garden and reared his orchard and his own land. He is said to have been devoted to his books and though meditative in his habit, was yet cheerful in his disposition. Though for along time a hermit, he was certainly not morose, nor disagreeable and enjoyed intercourse with his kind, if it could be peaceable. He frequently visited Roger Williams at Providence being about six miles from him. A few words will not be out of place concerning the relations between William Blackstone and Roger Williams and the Colony of Rhode Island. Roger William was a Puritan and preached in the Puritan Church in Salem, Blackstone was a dissenting clergyman of the Church of England. Both were educated men. Williams knew Blackstone well. We knew his mental training, his breath of mind, his independent spirit, his dominant will, his piety and his humanity. When Roger Williams received his order of banishment it was William Blackstone’s voice he heard – the voice of one crying in the wilderness; and he went to him as to his leader. He did not go to England as directed. He did not strike out as Blackstone did, new path for himself in the wilderness. He first settled at Seakonk and then at Providence because Blackstone was there. Their relations were intimate, but they were the relations of the teacher and the pupil.

The Puritans brought with them the most inaligant error that ever cured mankind. They believed, fostered and upheld the doctrine that the state was dependent on the church – that civil matters were, and ought to be subservient to religious matters – that the authorities of the church, should control and regulate the civil and social life of the individual. It was their inheritance from the centuries. That solitary thinker at Study Hill saw the error in all its past baleful history; and had felt the sting of its tyrannical application there grew up in his brooding mind the glowing conception of a free state, made up of free citizens, where statecraft and not priestcraft should govern, guide and control. The helpmeets and handmaid of this state should be religion, but the religion of conscience, and not the religion of dogma nor creed. It was to be the religion of churches formed on free choice and free sentiments and looking to themselves for support and maintenance and not the state. Roger Williams was banished from Salem not because he was a tolerationist; but because he attacked the greedy land monopoly embraced in the charter of Winthrop and his followers. It was the same greed which made William Blackstone’s holdings in Shawmut vanish away until with a faint show of justice, after compulsion failed, they bought him out.

Rodger Williams went to Seakonk in 1636. The next year by invitation of Governor Winthrop he moved nearer to Blackstone and settled at Providence. In a few years the settlement began to grow. All shades and forms of religious belief were represented. It was under the compelling will, the mental force and the tactful guidance of William Blackstone, who often addressed them, that these discordant elements were shaped and moulded, until the whole colony stood squarely and firmly upon the platform of civil and religious liberty. It was Blackstone’s example that were wrought into that charter that Roger William brought back to England with him. Blackstone had no civil ambitions. He cared nothing for place or position, nor for the power which they gave. With the vision of a seer he read the uncut pages of destiny. He saw this America. His aspirations led him only to the building and shaping of those great principles which formed the foundation stones of that mighty edifice which today shelters and protect ninety millions of men and women, not yet free, but looking out through portals which open their road to freedom. It is Blackstone’s spirit linked with that of Calvert which breathes out from that first amendment – the chiefest article in our great Bill of Rights – "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion; or prohibiting the free exercise there of." These words should be the legend beneath the cross on William Blackstone’s monument in the Mill yard at Donsdale. William Blackstone died two hundred and thirty years ago. Eager, earnest research and study has thrown new light upon his life and on the times in which he lived. The unprejudiced verdict now is, that the muse of history shows her tablets no figure more unique, elusive and romantic, no mind more profound, vigorous and virile, no soul more pure and exalted and no prescience more for reaching among all Americans of his time, than is shown, in the records of the hermit sage of "Study Hill".

Blackstone is said to have been a frequent visitor at Richard Smith’s fine old mansion at Wickford on the Narragansett Shore which was also a favorite resort of Rodger Williams. It is understood by all Antiquarians the Blackstone preached for Mr. Williams to his audience and the people of Providence. They differed on certain theological points but both being decided "tolerationist" they "agreed to disagree" and so harmonized. Their relation were of the most intimate and friendly sort. One says of Mr. Blackstone – "thought anouconformist and detesting prelacy his canonical coat which he continued to wear shows he was still attached to the English Church and regarded himself as a teacher of its tenets." In Johnson’s "wonder working Providence", the writer speaks of him as "retaining no sinbole of his former profession but a canonical coate".

The Episcopal Church very naturally claimed him as her son, though while here it was to be presumed he was not within its fold as Episcopalians could hardly have been numerous enough; at the time in his vicinity to have formed an exclusive audience and there seems no reason to doubt his having joined with that of his friend, preaching there and in the neighboring towns.

It has been thought by some that he settle in the "Gore" with the special design of planting or extending the Church of England. There seems to be no proof to substantiate such an idea. There is strong evidence that the same motives which partially at least caused him to emigrate from England caused him to migrate after reaching these shores. Among another anecdotes related of Blackstone is said that he tamed a bull which he used to ride in his old age. This however must not be taken as a proof of eccentricity, as in those early days it was common for the settlers to avail themselves of this only means of locomotion in the narrow paths of the forest, there being no horses in those early days or at least very few.

At the wedding of John Alden to Priscilla Mullen, - whose words spoken from her heart have encouraged many a love-lorn damsel since to put courage in a timid suitor, "why don’t you speak for yourself, John" – at this wedding it is said, "on proceeding to the nuptials he covered his bull with a handsome piece of broadcloth, and rode his back – but on his return he seated his bride on the animal and walked by her side, leading the bull by a rope fixed in his nose ring."

Mr. Blackstone was remarkable for his love of children – Bavliss memoirs of Plymouth Colony – when he visited Providence he carried apples from his orchard which he gave to the children. The first they had ever seen – Callenders discourse, - and the first raised in what is now Rhode Island. At a centennial celebration once held in Boston, by the Mass. Historical Society a present of apples was sent to their table from Cumberland said to have grown from the trees which grew from the sprouts of those planted by Blackstone. Some of the trees planted by his hand were living one hundred and forty years after they were set out. In historical records, Vol. 2 Page 332, Aug. 12, 1646 – "Blackstone’s apples gathered". Some writers says, "He had the first of that kind that were ever in the world called, "yellow sweetings, perhaps the richest and sweetest apples of the whole kind." He is said also to have been fond of roses, which he grew in Shawmut.

In 1836 three apple trees were standing in the meadow near the site of Study Hill and two of them bore apples.

The quiet of Study Hill was unbroken for many years, but after a while its lonely dweller heard the distant footsteps of the approaching multitudes. He suffered some encroachment from pioneer settlers. His situation at the "Wading Place" on the Pawtucket River was a pleasant one and exciting the cupidity of men. John Allen claim the same part of the west plain, which Blackstone himself claimed as his own, and occupied as part of the territory on which he settled. Allen had probably laid out and enclosed a part of the occupation of Blackstone and pulled up of his fence & c. was to test the claim of Blackstone to the tittle. Allen did not appear, probably not recognizing the jurisdiction of the court. The following is a record of the complaint from the "Old Colony Records, B. 7. page 155", "John Allen senior of Swansey complains vs Mr. Blackstone in a action of the case to the damage of twenty pounds for molesting him in his just rights by spoyling of his grass, pulling up of his fence and destroying of his hay upon his land which he had of the county lying on the Westerly side of the Western Plain from the said William Blackstone, which was done in the latter end of November in the year 1667. The jury find for the plaintiff six pounds damage and the cost of plaintiff according to verdict."

It is hard to see how Allen could get a verdict if he did not appear.

Blackstone when settled at Wauwepoonseag on emigrating from Shawmut supposed he was within the limits of Mass. Colony, though on stating the boundaries it fell within Plymouth Colony. Such claimants disturbed him and he complained to the government of Mass. that the inhabitants of Plymouth Colony were interfering with his rights and petitioned for protection from intruders. The difficulty whatever it was, was soon adjusted for we hear of no further complaint or interference. Plymouth Colony treated him with the utmost courtesy in respect to his rights. It recognized his tittle to the land.

Blackstone had occupied his land more than thirty years before the Rehoboth settlers purchased the Indian Tittle to the Attleborough Gore in which he lived. This was about ten years before the settlement. It is reasonable to suppose that he satisfied the Indians for his claim to his premises. The region was a favorite one for hunting and fishing by the natives and was on the Indian Trial to the crossing of the Pawtucket, or "Wading Place" of the river. Blackstone was always on friendly terms with the Indians.

Just how soon settlers began to intrude upon his solitude is not positively known. After the establishment of Seakonk the inhabitants of the place occasionally passed this way to Providence crossing the river near Blackstone’s house.

At a meeting held December 1650 it was voted "to have a convenient way four rods wide to be made by Edward Smith, to be for the town use of any that shall have occasion to pass from the town of Providence to Mr. Blackstone’s "the old mendon road also passed here, this place affording the only fordable crossing of the river.

Previous to his death, land were laid out adjoining his estate, as the names of several appear on the records. John Fitch and John Fitch Jr. had land near, and the formers grave is mentioned.

The history of the stern realities of the Old Colony Times had now and than spicing of romance. It was long believed that Blackstone had an only daughter, who was born away from the abode of society and educated by her father along. She had grown up in communion with nature and was graced with the simplicity of nature’s charms, a child of the forest and field, a flower of the wilderness, and it was supposed that she was married to John Stevenson. This statement is erroneously made in Mass. historical collection.

This was to tempting of a subject for the novelist. It is a fictitious work in the two volumes. It was published many years ago and was called "Humors of Utopia". A daughter of Blackstone was one of the principal characters. It seems almost sacrilege to lay hands on such a picture. In this matter of fact world the "mere frost work of fancy" must often be dissolved by the sunshine of truth. She had no existence except in imagination. John Stevenson was called the son-in-law of Blackstone instead of stepson, and that is the only foundation for the supposition that he had a daughter.

Mr. Blackstone left one son who settled near New Haven and bought land at a place called Blackstoneville and followed the sea, adding to his lands from time to time, according to tradition and became the founder of the Branford Family of Blackstones. In "Old Colony Records" for June 1st 1675 is the following "Lieut. Hunt, Eugene Smith and Mr. Daniel Smith are appointed and authorized by the court to take some present care of the estate of William Blackstone deceased, and of his son now left by him, and to see that at the next court, he do propose a man to the court to be his guardian; which in case he do neglect, the court will then see cause to make choice of one of them."

In the same records of the date Oct. 27, 1675 – "Mr. Nathaniel Paine and Mr. Daniel Smith are appointed and approved by the court to be the guardian unto John Blackstone the son of Mr. William Blackstone, deceased.

The name Blackstone is inseparably connected with that noble river which flowed pasted his ancient and solitary dwelling. It is also preserved in streets and towns, in buildings, bank and factories. A magnificent building in Branford bears the name "John Blackstone Memorial Library" and a splendid branch library in Chicago a similar dedication to Timothy B. Blackstone. The former was erected by Timothy B, Blackstone and the latter by his wife who survives him.

Mr. William Blackstone has become a prominent character in the history of the colonization of New England and a striking figure upon the canvas of the past in American History. The baffling mystery of his life is made for mere interesting and antiquarian research far more eager by the thought that possibly untold riches of manuscript perished by the hand of ignorant savage.

The valley of the Blackstone River has become celebrated as a manufacturing district and contributed by the advantages of waterpower to the wealth of New England.

Hardly could Blackstone the lover of undisturbed solitude, have dreamed when he forsook the peninsula of Boston and built his lonely dwelling on this placid stream that his peaceful retreat would so soon be the scene of Industry, and the abode of a numerous population, and its silence broken by the busy work of art. Were his spirits permitted to revisit the scene of his former enjoyment, he would be obliged to penetrate a new wilderness, to form a new garden, and plant a new orchard, and to seek in a more distant region a sport congenial to his taste.

Everything in relation to William Blackstone is of increasing interest to the public; therefore this relation is intended to include the smallest known minutize of his life. It could never have occurred to him, who to avoid the notice of men, sought the shades of solitude, that future ages would take so deep an interest in his history; that he would be an object of minute research to the antiquarian; and that every circumstance connected with his life, which could be rescued from the hand of oblivion, would be sought out with so much avidity.

The place which he chose for his abode was truly a beautiful and romantic one, such as a recluse and a lover of nature would select. The place where his house stood was a small hill, the surface at which would make about an acre. On the east side was a gradual ascent. On the west side it rose abruptly from the river to the height of sixty or seventy feet. The Blackstone River wound gracefully at the base of the hill, and formed a slight curve a short distance south of it. The margin of the river was formerly some distance to the west. The summit of the hill commanded a fine view of the Blackstone River; and the valley to the south for more than a mile. To the east was a fertile and delightful valley which opened to the south on the border of meadow. It was bounded on the east and northeast by a gentle eminence on the top of which was the meadow Road, so often mentioned in the Ancient Records. This valley was cultivated by the hands of Blackstone. Here were seen within the memory of men the stumps of apple trees, cut down in their time which were said to have grown from the sprouts of the trees first planted by the hermit. His well too, was long pointed out at the southern border of this valley. Long after it was filled with moss and weeds the pure water still bubbled up from its fountains. His grave was also pointed out – although with less certainly – in the orchard about two rods east from the foot of the hill, and north of the well. The flat stone which marked his grave finally became invisible, likely through removal.

After his death and after many years, the spot on which he lived returned to a state of nature. Heavy timber grew on "Study Hill", and less than one hundred years ago its surface was covered with a thrifty growth of young tress. Oaks of a hundred years have been cut from the "Hill".

Some few years since an interesting paper on Blackstone was read in Boston. The result of recent investigation, as then shown new light upon the possible parentage and birthplace of Boston’s first inhabitant. They are history mingled with conjuncture. It was supposed that there might be relationship between William of Boston and the celebrated law commentator Sir William Blackstone. The compiler of this record has heard his father, who resided sometime in Canada say that at one time a certain John Blackstone, a descendant of Sir William Blackstone held a government position in Canada, that correspondence passed between him and the American Family and that he said he had no doubt that the family was the same.

Some years since, two men well acquainted with the American Family were looking through a well known gallery of portraits in London. Coming before a picture, both remarked the strong resemblance to a certain member of the Branford stock. Upon looking for the name, they were informed that it was the portrait of Sir William Blackstone.

According to Mr. Amory, until resent years the only promising clue to the parentage and birth place of Boston first inhabitant, is a power in 1653, of Sarah Blackstone – Suffolk Deed – to collect money advanced, in which she is decried as of "New Castle upon on Tyne", and which mentions the name of Stevenson the first husband of Blackstone’s Wife. Later investigators have opened other clues, and there may be a solution of this question. Whether true or not these clues are possessed of much interest. Mr. Amory, on good authority makes William Blackstone, a near kinsman of John Blackstone, the close friend of Cromwell. This John Blackstone died just before the restoration and was one of the regicides. Close to this John who was a member of the long Parliament, and one of the Judges of Charles the First was Nathaniel Blackstone who settled in Maryland in 1623. He is said to have been descended from the regicide. Relationship between the New England and the Maryland Families has always been suspected. Nathaniel settled in Maryland the same year given by some, as the date of William’s settlement in Boston – 1623. He was proprietor of a large island in the Potomac River called "Blackstone’s Island". Branches of this family settled in early times in Ohio, passed to Indiana, Illinois and further west, while many still remained in Maryland and Virginia. A family of Scotch Irish Blackstones probably driven out of Ulster during the hornible massacre of 1642 settled in Nova Scotia upon the outbreak of the Revolutionary War they migrated to Mass. and took an active part. John, Benjamin and William being enrolled there. Mr. Amory says, "It seems reasonably to suppose that all of the Blackstone descend from the well known stem in the Palatinate of Durham – the earliest of whom mentioned Sir Hugh – was proprietor of "Blackstone"; about six miles from the Episcopal Cathedral City. "Few Families of Private Gentry" – says Surtees in his history of Durham – "have spread more widely or flourished fairer than Blackstone; but all its branches have perished like the original stock. One family can trace its blood without hereditary possessions". The family of Blackstone was one of great wealth and honor according to the history, above referred to and reached the highth of its prosperity under one John, probably the one mentioned elsewhere as of the time of Queen Elizabeth. He had fifteen children, for all of them he was able to make a liberal provision. His eldest son was Sir William born in 1553 and married to Alice Claxton in 1581. They had nine children and all of the six sons were living in 1624. William was the name of the fifth son. He it is who is supposed to be the first settle in Boston. Through this Sir William and the son who inherited the tittle "the last sweeping of the great Blackstone estate were swepted away," both father and son being wild and reckless in character and life. Alice Claxton however brought her husband a fine estate, and upon it "in the house at Wynyard" they seemed to have lived most of time after their marriage. Here their children probably were born. The estate is described as beautiful, and the house one of the most convenient and handsome in the district. Mr. Amory says, "Knights and beneficed Clergyman abounded in the family," and if as suggested William of Boston was the son of Alice Claxton, his declining in the impoverished condition of the family and after having obtained a collegiate Education, to conform to the Ecclesiastical requirements and be beneficed may explain the tradition in the Connecticut line, that their first American ancestor left home from some misunderstanding with his parents. The name has been variously spelled "Blackstone" is the most common. William adopted the name Blaxton as appears by the signature on receiving his degrees at Emmanuel College – called the Puritan College – because many eminent Puritan devines graduated there. This mode follow the spelling of his mother’s name which was no doubt originally Clackstone. She changed her married name as her maiden name had been changed, and that William so spelled his name suggest that Alice ( Claxton ) Blaxton was his mother.

His taste in horticulture and woodcraft, and his skill therein and in all accomplishment of a similar nature, tends to confirm the conjecture that he was brought up on a large Manorial Estate and the chase and field sports which he as the son of a English Country Gentlemen would undoubtedly participate in, "prepared his constitution to cope with the exposure and privation of the forest life, and gave him the knowledge and experience required to obtain his food and take pleasure in its pursuit." There were many fine old manor houses in the Blackstone Family. That of Blackstone Proper, standing in an attractive situation was taken down during the last century. The most celebrated of all was "Gibside" which remained in the name until the death of the last Baron" Sir Francis Blackstone in 1713. It lies between New Castle on the Tyne, and Ravenworth Castle on Derwent water. Historians speak of "the beautiful and magnificent scenery of the place, rendered more beautiful by the landscape which surrounds it. The parks is four miles in circumference and the drive to the "Stately Banqueting House seated on a noble elevation" is described as "through the bosom of a thick forest sometime on the brink of a deep ravine, and at intervals descending on the easy inclination of the hills, but still embowered with venerable oaks". The gardens, the pasturage, the cultivated lands and the Mansion House itself were in keeping with the magnificence of the great park, and formed together an estate and home such as a family of wealth cultivation and distinction would possess and occupy. This place, there is every reason to believe, belonged to near kinsmen of William of Boston, and he was here a frequent and welcome visitor. Such was the home and such the friends he left.

The Character he ever sustained proved him to have belonged to a family of education and culture. These recent developments only add to the interest and mystery surrounding his life. What was the real underlying cause of his self-imposed exile? Powerful indeed must have been the influence and urgent the conscientious necessity which compelled him to leave some of the fairest of earth’s scenes and the intercourse of refined and cultured friends, for the deep solitudes of the American wilderness. On the One Hundred and Eightieth Anniversary of his death, an effort was made to arouse public interest in the raising of funds to erect a suitable monument to William Blackstone. A few weeks later on July 4, 1855 the Anniversary of his marriage, quite a number of people gathered at his grave. The spot was then "designated by two small boulders of semi-crystallized quartz rock". An association was formed called the "Blackstone Monument Association". Officers were elected and a constitution adopted. Any person by presenting his name and subscribing ten cents was thereby made a member of the association. An oration was delivered by Mr. S.C. Newman a lineal descendant of the first minister of Rehoboth.

The monument was but a shadowy mirage. The grave of the sage of "Study Hill" was neglected and its site almost unknown for many years. We who live in the hurray and rush of the twentieth century should pause long enough to think upon the men who first gave us the blessings of our land of freedom, that we may keep their memory and the principles they established fresh within our hearts. At last the mirage becomes real but the peaceful valley is no longer there. "Study Hill" has been entirely taken away and in its place stands a large cotton mill. While this work of demolition going on the bones of Mr. Blackstone were disinterred in the presence of Mr. Lorenzo Blackstone of Norwich, Conn. and of President Gammell of the Rode Island Historical Society. These were placed in an appropriate box and again buried under the building. How strange is what we term the irony of fate! The would be recluse, disturbed in life, is disturbed in death also. Intruders coveted his pleasant domains while he occupied them. Today the demon of manufacture seized upon them even removing soil in which his remains were placed. He is denied his own grave. Instead of waving branches above his head and the sighing of soft winds, is heard the noise of hurrying feet and the voice of shouting multitudes. The sculptured shaft rears itself not amid the giant trees beside his flowing river, but near the giant engine by whose mighty power the hum of whirring spindles is heard unceasingly. The spirit of the gentle sage could scarcely reconcile itself to such a change, and must have passed saddened away from its accustomed haunts forever. When the grave of Mr. Blackstone was discovered there were fragments of a coffin, hammered nails such as were made in those days and pieces of bones. The sides of the grave were plainly visible. That the grave found was that of William Blackstone is assured. The monument stands a very few yards from the grave and in a line with it. The precise spot is covered by Lonsdale Co’s, Ann and Hope Mill. The monument was erected by some of the descendants of William Blackstone, and the inscription was written by a member of the Lonsdale Co.

It is of granite about twelve feet high, and about six feet square. It is within the enclosed grounds of the mill and is the only object on a beautiful green lawn.

On the southerly or front Face, beneath a cross carved in the stone is this inscription. – "The grave of the Reverend William Blackstone, founder of the town of Boston and the first white settler in Rhode Island".

On the east side. – "A Student of Emmanuel College, Cambridge he took Holy Order in the Church of England, in whose communion he lived and died".

On the west side. – "Coming from Boston to this spot in 1635, he died May 26, 1675, aged over eighty years and was here buried".

On the north side. – "Erected by the Lineal Descendant of William Blackstone, A.D. 1889".




JOHN BLACKSTONE


Records evidence concerning John Blackstone is extremely meager.

After the death of his father May 26, 1675 three persons were appointed by the Plymouth Colony Courts to take charge of "William Blackstone’s Estate and of his son left by him.

He was ordered "To choose a guardian". He was mentioned in 1688 in the list of those "Who owned or occupied lands in the North Purchase".

He leased his lands and cows to Mr. Dailey in 1692".

He sold his lands or some of them, with his mansion in 1692. In this deed he is designated a "Shoemaker".

He was banished from Attleborough in the year 1714 "As likely to become a Public Charge".

In addition to this, we have traditions. All traditions are founded on facts. They may be family traditions and related to an individual. They may be of a place and related to and are concerned with its early settlement and existence before written records began to be reliable. They may relate to and associate both the individual and the place, and their vital characteristic is persistency. Like the comet they have a nucleus, and like it they have appendages sufficiently attenuated.

Romulus and Rome will be forever associated in minds of men, but the manner of his nourishment is decidedly filmy.

In the town of Branford, Connecticut there is network of marriages between the Foots, Baldwin, Wilfords, Hoadleys, Frisbies and others with the Blackstones. Among them we find the following traditions. about the year 1700 or prior there to John Blackstone with his wife, came in their own ship from Rhode Island and bought land in Branford Conn. and the place is called Blackstoneville today. He sailed the seas and added to his holdings. He once went back to his former home to look after interest in land that he had in Rhode Island or Attleborough.

These are scants data upon which to attempt a biographical sketch of a man who was born two hundred and fifty years ago, in a new and almost unsettled wilderness and a territory still under the fearful threat of savage ferocity and its butchery and devastation.

John Blackstone grew to adolescence in the home of his father and mother. That father was a man of culture, of independent spirit and kind and benevolent heart. The companion and friend of Rodger Williams. The mother a loving guide and counselor to the boy who was her latest born, and the only fruit of her marriage with an educated and eminent man.

How soon was this happy home to pass away! The fate were weaving baleful fibers in his thread of life. The loving mother died. In two short years the aged father followed to that land "From whose borne no traveler returns", and in the year his death King Phillip’s War began and the fair patrimony to which the young son fell heir was devastated by the savage foe". Houses, barns, books furniture, - everything became prey to the devouring flames. This estate of William Blackstone which fell to John his only heir as will appear by an inventory taken two days after William’s death was as follows:

Sixty acres of land and two shares of meadow in Providence.

The west plain.

The South Neck.

Land about the house and orchard amounting to two hundred acres.
The meadow called Blackstone Meadow.

Personal Property consisting of books, manuscripts and other personal property, fifty-six pounds three shillings and six pence. A marginal note in the Plymouth Colony Records says: "This estate – the movables – was destroyed and carried away by the natives".

The following entries appear in the "Old Colony Records" of date June 1st 1675, six days after the death of William Blackstone. "Lieut. Hunt, Eugene Smith and Mr. Daniel Smith are appointed and authorized by the court, to take some present care of the estate of William Blackstone deceased and of his son now left by him and to see that at the next court, he do propose a man to the court to be his guardian, which in case he do neglect, the court will then cause to make choice of one for him.

In the same record of Date Oct. 27, 1675, we find;

"Mr. Nathaniel Paine and Mr. Daniel Smith are appointed and approved by the court to be the guardian unto John Blackstone, son of Mr. William Blackstone, deceased".

We now approach a period in young John Blackstone’s life which is obscure, and which, reared as he was must have been a very unhappy period for him. We find him designated in his deed to Whipple as "Shoemaker". Now we know that in those days a boy learned a trade by being indentured by his parents or guardian to some master workman until his majority. Such undoubtedly was the case with young Blackstone. It certainly was a sad change from the tender loving kindness of such a home as he had to the legal custody and control of a strange and perhaps harsh and exacting taskmaster.

Some pertinent question suggest themselves. Why did not these guardians out of a splendid estate, rebuild the home, renovated the fields and thus provide a sufficient income for the support and education of their ward. Why did not John Blackstone choose John Stevenson for his guardian? Why did not John Stevenson ask for the appointment for himself? Because he was jealous of his half brother. He coveted his estate. He would get it if he could, or as much of it as he could. Blackstone’s guardians were Stevenson’s friends.

John Stevenson lived with his mother and stepfather from the date of their marriage July 1, 1659 until the death of his stepfather. Up to November 7, 1666, he was a minor and owed his service to his parents. From his majority to his stepfather’s death he was either employed by his Step Father and undoubtedly paid his service or he rented the place, and the rents of his large and productive place would amply provide for the frugal wants of the aged couple during their lives.

Now in neither case could he have had a legal or equitable claim in any part of those lands, but he did claim and he did get. What had he to fear from that young boy whose guardians had shown both difference and unfriendliness to their ward.

Blackstone’s land were held by him without survey or record until 1671, when according to the Old Colony Records on March 5, 1671 "Mr. Stephen Paine (Sr.) of Rehoboth and Mr. Nicholas Tanner are appointed by the court to see Mr. Blackstone’s land laid forth according to the grant". It must have been sometime prior to this that fearing for his possessions in Plymouth Colony he cast an anchor to windward by buying the "Sixty Acres and two shares of Meadow" in Rhode Island or Providence. It does not appear when Stevenson received his slice of the estate but it was probably when as noted the lands "Laid out" to William Blackstone were recorded. The lands taken by John Stevenson from his half-brother are recorded in the records of the North Purchase; Book 1, page 47 and are as following: "Fifty Acres of upland lying upon Pawtucket River, most of it upon the south neck and being part of that land that was left by William Blackstone and granted by the court to John Stevenson; bounded to the eastward the land of John Fitch and the common – westerly Pawtucket River and southerly - to the northward the land of John Blackstone. It being 106 rods long.

Two Acres of Meadow adjoining to said land lying in two pieces, are piece within the former tact of land, and the other by the riverside, upon the southernmost end of it, three acres of fresh meadow lying in the most northeast corner of the Meadow commonly known by the name of Blackstone’s Great Meadow, often called the Parson’s Meadow, from a white oak tree and so through the Breath of the Meadow to the River; the run bounding it to the northwards – westward to the meadow of John Blackstone – eastward the Swamp – southward the Uplands."

William Blackstone was an eminently just and conscientious man as well as kind hearted. If he felt that there was some compensation due to John Stevenson for his care of his Parents during the few last years of their lives, knowing as he did that John Blackstone was his sole heir at law and would inherit all his estate, would he not provided for Stevenson either by will or deed during his lifetime? Was not such provision made for him? Where else did he get the land recorded to him, and described as following: "Fifty acres of land more or less, described as follows: bounded east the land of Ensign Nich. Peck and Rob Miller, north the land of Sam Carpenter, west a highway four rods wide between John Blackstone and this lot, and a little piece of common land, south coming near John Fitch’s grave, to the common. There is to be taken out of the lot a highway two rods wide next to Sam Carpenter’s land, to meet with the highway at the end of said Carpenter’s lot. Likewise two acres of land that I have taken up adjoining my own land on the southerly end of it, that I had in exchange with my brother John Blackstone." These lands were undoubtedly part of William Blackstone’s original Estate.

The following is a description of John Blackstone’s portion of the estate: "One hundred and fifty acres of upland, swamp and meadow ground more or less, containing the west plain – commonly so called – and land adjacent. Bounded to the northward the land of Isaac Allen – to the southward, the land of John Stevenson – to the westward the Pawtucket River – to the eastward the land of John Stevenson, the highway and the undivided land, there running a country highway through it to Pawtucket River being four rods wide.

Likewise a parcel of fresh meadow commonly known by the name of Blackstone’s Meadow, being eight acres, bounded to the eastward the meadow of John Stevenson. Likewise twenty acres laid out to John Blackstone granted to him by the King’s Jury for a way taken through his farm to Pawtucket River, running 76 rods N.W. and by west and 42 S.W. and by south bounded round by the undivided land this tract lying by the new road to Dedham.

Likewise two acres of land be it more or less which his brother John Stevenson, lying adjoining to his farm: being bounded to the highway easterly and his own farm westerly – and southerly by a small run of water. This land lies on the westerly side of the highway next to the house and in consideration of it John Stevenson has two acres of what John Blackstone was to have allowed by the King’s Jury for the highway through his land to Providence and John Stevenson had his two acres to the southerly end of his fifty acres tact." R.V. Purchase B.1 Page 153.

The foregoing probably are the boundaries of those lands "laid out in 1671, March 5 by Stephen Paine and Nicholas Tanner to William Blackstone but they are not recorded to him until after his death in Attleborough, Plymouth Colony and it was at this time that a Stevenson received his slice of the estate and this no doubt was with the connivance of Blackstone’s Guardians.

The following is a copy of the deed from John Blackstone to David Whipple and the original is now in the possession of Rode Island Historical Society.

Deed.


"To all to whom this deed of sale shall come. John Blaxton of Rehoboth in the Co. of Bristoll formerly in the Colony of New Plymouth but now of Mass. in New England – Shoemaker – Sending Greet’s. For a reasonable – of this county in land and paid to him by David Whipple husbandman of the town of Providence in the Narragansett Bay in New England sells te his house and lands – that is to say – his mansion house and land – on the east side of the river and lying and being with in the precincts of Rehoboth aforesaid 150 A and is situated on the plain C.D. the west plain B.D. to the northward the land of Isaac Allen – to the southward to the land of John Stevenson – to the W.D. Pawtucket River – to the eastward part of it to the land of John Stevenson, and part of it to the highway and part of it to the undivided land, with 20 A allowed for a highway te te the later bounded southward by a small run of water – and 2 A on the westerly side of the country highway next the house.

Dated Sept. 10, 1692. John Blaxton.
Witnessed by
Thos. Oliver. Acknowledged Oct. 26, 1692.
Anthony Sprague.
Rec’d Dec. 7, 1692.

As has been said there is always a nucleus of truth in mouth to mouth history. Branford tradition says that John Blackstone came there from Rhode Island in his own ship. When did he become a sailor? Did he break the irksome bond of his apprenticeship run away to sea? Would he have so invested his money unless he was familiar with seafaring life? If he had been a sailor he no doubt was often at Branford which was a thriving seaport town and he would as the owner of a vessel be attracted to such a place. Savage says he rented his land and cows to Dailey in 1692. No doubt he had rented them before while he followed the sea. If such was his life he no doubt returned from time to time, and had time and means to rebuild the wasted home and stock the farm. There was a mansion there when he sold. There were cows there the same year.

Branford tradition states the cause of his leaving Attleborough was dissension with his brother-in-law concerning his marriage which was opposed. It is again said that they were concerning land. The Mass. Colony Records mention John Stevenson as William Blackstone’s son-in-law instead of stepson. An easy continuance of this error and he could be called John Blackstone’s brother-in law. There is no wife signature on Blackstone’s deed to Whipple. He probably was not married then. There were no doubt quarrels, which led to the sale of his land, probably with Stevenson and his friends. If these quarrels did not cease with the sale of the land, they would soon cease with Stevenson, for he died Sept. 16, 1695. We may safely place the of his marriage between Sept. 10, 1692 the date of the Whipple deed and Jan. 18, 1699 the date of his son John’s Birth, probable a year of two before Stevenson’s death. He had a wife when he came to Branford. We may thus fix the date of his arriving a t Branford between 1692 and 1700.

Let us return again to Branford tradition. The story has for generations been current that after many years John journeyed from Branford to his former home to look after some land interests that he had there. The date is unknown but it may well coincide with the only other written record of John Blackstone’s presence in Attleborough: the date 1714 when he was banished. Whether John left land unsold at his former home is not certainly known.

There seem however to be no record of the disposal of the sixty acres and two shares of meadow in Providence which were mentioned in William Blackstone's inventory. Did John Blackstone still retain some interest? But leave out these uncertainties.

John Stevenson died Sept. 16, 1695. He left no widow nor children. His natural heirs were ones’mus or his children. James who was alive and made out his inventory and his brother John Blackstone who thought of half blood, would inherit with the other brother, and perhaps be sole heir to those lands of John Stevenson, which he received from the estate of William Blackstone. Blackstone did not probably know of his interest for a long time and when he did he no doubt attributed to a just Providence the return to him some portion of those lands of which we must assert he was through John Stevenson most unjustly deprived: but he had waited too long when he returned to Attleborough; he found his land in the possession of the heirs or grantees of his brother. They had nine points in the law. If some of those Attleborough selectmen were as no doubt some of their relatives or friends were possessors of the land in which Blackstone thought he had a interest we can understand the celerity an finality of their judgement against him, by which they settled the other tenth point in the law.

It recalls the story of the man, who being accused of stealing a pig and being plainly proven guilty was yet, acquitted by the jury. To his own dumfounded lawyer he said, "It’s nothing, each one of those jurymen had a piece of the pig."

We must however – we are constrained to note the pitiful tender and almost divine grace by which they restrained themselves from declaring this apparently impoverished man a beggar, but only "likely to become a public charge". We will note also that this distinction did not change the decree. Stripped without equity of his property, he was banished for not having any and the reason given was the infamous subterfuge that he was destitute.

We seem to see that rugged old sailor standing before his judge, and with a Blackstone twinkle in his grey eyes sayin, "Master, I’ll go! You’re right! I am likely to become a public charge!." When Charles the Second came to the throne, his court was assailed by the cries and complaints of those who had been banished by colonial Puritans and on this side "the woods were full of them". The God-Fearing Puritan seemed to think he was not fully armed and equipped unless he had a blunderbuss on his shoulder a cutlass by his side and a decree of banishment tucked under his belt.

There is an Attleborough tradition that John Blackstone was a dissipated man. This seem to have no more tangible foundation then the decree of banishment, and that other elusive and unanswerable argument, that "he was a minister’s son". Now when we read some of the accounts charged against certain conventions of Puritan Ministers which like that against Falstaff included an "intolerable deal" of liquid refreshments and reflect that those ministers were as continent at heart as Attleborough Selectmen. We shall conclude that Blackstone’s offense in their eyes was that he took plebeian "straight" whiskey while they only indulged in aristocratic "Highballs" of hard cider and New England rum.

John Blackstone was called "spendthrift". There is not one spark of evidence to substantiate any such charge and removed away from Attleborough, as his father had done from Boston before him and no doubt for similar reasons. The Blackstones did not belong to the Puritan Church, but while his father could oppose to the spirit of Puritan tyranny, intolerance and greed, the strong trained and cultured intellect of a priest of the Church of England and his own superior innate force of character, his orphaned son had none of those defense. We assert that tender orphan boy was wronged cruelly. Wronged both in person and estate and "grievously wounded in the house of his friends". We assert further that never has a man or men wrought a cruel wilful injury against a fellow human being but that in justification of the act there has been invoked the spirit of falsehood. This evil spirit was brooded over the moldering dust, and shadowed the name and fame of William Blackstone’s son long enough. Too long.

John returned to Branford and followed his seafaring life until his death. There is no record of Church nor town, nor grave showing the time of place where he completed his pilgrimage and his obituary record like that of some of his descendants and thousands of others maybe summed up in the little phrase " Lost at Sea". Of his wife the single word "Catherine" tells all her short pathetic history. Of his estate we can only surmise that his son John owned some part of his rapid mise in prosperity and wealth to the means left him by his father. Whatever may have been John Blackstone character whatever his faults and failing he is claimed as an ancestor by as strong stalwart and high minded a body of descendants ever represented New England, either there or elsewhere and there are many of them. If there have been doubts the Branford Family are descended from John the son of William. It is to be said that for many years it was utterly denied that William ever had a son. The records of his time now brought to light leave this question no more the subject of dispute. Antiquarian opinion in New England is settled. That John Blackstone the son of William settled at Blackstoneville near Branford and gave a name to the place. That the Branford Families are descended from him. This opinion is confirmed by legend and tradition while negative testimony however unsatisfactory shows that except as herein set forth, no Blackstone from any part of the earth ever settled at Branford. Savage whose authority is not questioned gives the line William, John 1st, John 2nd and the residence Boston, Rehoboth, Providence and Branford.




NATHANIEL FOOT.


Nathaniel Foot was the first settle of Weathersfield, Connecticut (1639) was married in England about the year 1615 to Elizabeth Deming, sister of John Deming who was one of the first settlers of Weathersfield. After the death of Mr. Foot his widow about the year 1646 married Thomas Wells, Magistrate after Governor of the Colony whom she like wise survived. Nathaniel Foot died 1644, age fifty-one years. Elizabeth died July 28, 1683age about 88. They had seven children of whom Robert was the forth born about 1627.




ROBERT FOOT.


Robert Foot first of Weathersfield Connecticut then part of Hew Haven in the same state now known as Wallingford and from 1668 until his death a resident of Branford was the son of Nathaniel Foot of Branford. His wife was Sarah – who after his death married Aaron Blatchley. Robert Foot bore the tittle of Lieutenant.




STEPHEN FOOT.


Stephen Foot of Branford was the son of Robert Foot. He was married to Elizabeth Nash daughter of James Nash of Branford. His daughter Elizabeth was married to Capt. John Blackstone, Grandson of William Blackstone of Boston. The Connecticut records give the name of thirty-five Foots who were in the Revolutionary War




JOHN BLACKSTONE.


Capt. John Blackstone – as he was usually designed – the Grandson of William Blackstone was born July 18, 1699. This date is arrived at from the obituary records on his tombstone. It is probable that both his father and himself were sufficiently disregarded by the puritans by whom they were surrounded that no church records of them would be preserved, of the Church of England there were none. Whether Capt. John had a brother or sister is not certainly known. Amory says that John the son of William had sons: He says also, that one of his sons lost his life at the siege of Louisberg, during the war with France in the year 1746. We have not been able to verify the statement. There is an old record at Branford which purports to give the wife and family of Ralph Blackstone the son of John Jr. . This record gives Jerome Blackstone born Dec. 18, 1715. Ralph was not married until the year 1802, now if any Blackstone was born in the year 1715 he could not by any possibility be other than a son of the first John, but the date maybe wrong. It can only be taken as the faintest confirmation of Mr. Amory’s statement.

Capt. John Blackstone is described as having held a lieutenant’s commission at the seized of Louisberg. It is also said that he lost several ships there. He did not however lose his life there, as he died at Branford Jan. 3, 1785.

By the records of the General Court of Connecticut immediately prior to 1746 it appears that I preparing to assist the mother country in the war against France she raised a Regiment of soldiers and appointed officers for it. She also appointed three commissioners who should have summary power to provide uniforms, guns, ammunition and were authorized in the same manner to provide ships to transport the troops and supplies; the Colony having but one coast guard ship which they could not spare. No doubt John Blackstone’s ships were there and no doubt he was with them. A faint tradition has percolated through the generation that a Blackstone ship manned by relatives and friends from Branford, attempted in a fog off the coast of Nova Scotia to capture a large Merchant Man which proved to be a Man of War and the vessel and crew were sent to Davy Jone’s Locker. This legend doubtless grew out of the loss of some of Capt. John ships at Louisberg. In what manner the loss took place whether by storm or battle can not now be said. The ships owned in the Colonies were used in the coast and West India trade. Capt. John followed this trade and amassed a large fortune for those days. It was during the period when silver advanced from eight shillings an ounce to more than fifty shillings. The only place to invest money was in land. John became possessed of a very large estate, adding to the land and vessels left him by his father from whom he learned the mariners art. Capt. John lived to see the Colonies free and independent states.

His son John was in the Coast Guards and no doubt took part in the defense of the Colony when Tyron plundered New Haven and burned East Haven, Fairfield and Norwalk.

His Grandson served two years or more in the Colonial Army and was pensioned by Congress in 1832. The Blackstones at Branford owned all the wooded islands off the coast. These became a hiding place for raiders from New York, where they might conceal themselves until a favorable opportunity offered to loot and pillage the defenseless homes, in the absence of the organized Coast Guards. The Blackstones cut and burned the timber on the islands at their own loss and expense. Making the islands deserts.

Capt. John was married to Elizabeth Foot by whom he had John (Jr) – Abigail – Elizabeth and Stephen. Stephen died without issues. Elizabeth married Isaac Hoadley, March 31, 1757. Abigail married Abraham Hoadley, Dec. 1750. Capt. John married 2nd Rebecca Harrison. No living issues. He married 3rd Sarah Huggins. No issue.




WILLIAM HOADLEY.


Capt. William Hoadley was born in England about 1630. He first appeared at Saybrook, Connecticut in the year 1663. In 1666 he bought the home lot of the Reverend Abraham Piersons of Branford when the latter removed to New Jersey. This lot was on the West Side of the public green where the Potoker House now stands, and there he conducted his business as a merchant. His name appears on the New Plantation Covenant of Branford January 1667 – 8. He was admitted a freeman of the Colony of Connecticut Oct. 1669. Of his first wife nothing is known, but by her he had seven children. Capt. Hoadley about the year 1686 married Mary Farrington, widow of John Farrington and daughter of William Bullard, all of Dedham, Mass. She died May 12, 1703. He then remarried Ruth Frisbie, widow of John Frisbie and the daughter of the Rev. John and Rebecca Greyson Bowers.


SAMUEL HOADLEY.


Samuel Hoadley was the son of Captain William Hoadley. He was married to Abigail Farrington, daughter of John and Mary (Bullard) Farrington. Samuel Hoadley’s birth is unknown but April 1683 he was appointed to a town office, which probably would make his birth about 1662. His estate was inventoried in the year 1714 and amounted to one thousand and eighty seven pounds, a large estate in those times. He was Great Grandfather of Gov. Hoadley of Ohio through his son Timothy.




ABIGAIL HOADLEY.


Abigail Hoadley was the daughter of Samuel Hoadley and Abigail Farrington. She was married to Joseph Frisbie Dec. 5, 174_. She was the Great Grandmother of Stephen Foot Blackstone.




EDWARD FRISBIE.


Edward Frisbie settled in Branford in the year 1644. The name of his wife and the dates of his marriage are unknown.




JOHN FRISBIE.


John Frisbie was the son of Edward Frisbie. The name of his mother is not known. He was married to Ruth Bowers daughter of John Bowers and Rebecca (Greyson) Bowers who was the daughter of Thomas Greyson, date of marriage 1674.




JOSEPH FRISBIE.


Joseph Frisbie was the son of John Frisbie and Ruth (Bowers) Frisbie. He married December the 5th, 1711. Abigail Hoadley.




REBECCA FRISBIE.


Rebecca Frisbie married Noah Baldwin on the twenty-first day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and twenty three.
Their daughter, Rebecca Baldwin married John Blackstone Jr., May the 19th in the year seventeen hundred and fifty-seven.




JOHN BALDWIN.


John Baldwin came to Branford with the other Milford Settlers. He married first Mary – and had seven children. He married for a second wife Mary Bruen daughter of John Bruen of Stapleford England. He was the father by his second wife of seven children.




GEORGE BALDWIN.


George Baldwin settled in Branford in the year 1686. He joined the church in 1693. He married Deborah Rose daughter of Deacon Jonathan Rose of Branford. He was a Blacksmith and was held in high esteem by his fellow citizens. George was the son of John Baldwin and Mary Bruen.




NOAH BALDWIN.


Noah Baldwin was the son of Deacon George Baldwin and upon his father’s death he inherited his estate. Noah had a son Noah – and he had a son John who now in his eighty second year owns the place and has a son and Grandson there, making eight generation living and dead upon the same farm.
There were sixty-two Baldwins in the Connecticut list of Revolutionary Soldiers.




JOHN BLACKSTONE.


John Blackstone, Great Grandson of William Blackstone and the son of Captain John was commonly known as John Jr. He was no doubt a member of the Coast Guard and defended the coast against British Raids with the Bands of Patriots who were organized into platoons of twelve and patrolled the coast for defense. On occasion when he was absent from home on guard at some other place the British Troops from near New York landed at his home which was near the coast. They drove off cows and sheep, took pork and beef and every kind of provision. They stripped the place. Mrs. Blackstone had just baked several loaves of bread for her family. The soldiers took everything. The good wife and mother will the spirit of John Hampden, whose blood was in her vein cried out against their inhumanity in leaving her nothing for her helpless little children. One of the men moved, with pity at her situation threw her back one loaf of bread. Among those children was Stephen Foot Blackstone, a boy yet under ten years of age. The whole scene was so impressed on his childish memories, that though he died at the age of over eighty nine years to the last of his life he could relate the incident as here in given; which the writer of this record his Grandson has often heard him do. John the son of John Jr. and the eldest was fifteen when the war broke out and served in the army for two years or more, being pensioned under the law of Congress of 1832. Though his name cannot be found in the Connecticut Rolls, no Coast Guard records were kept to show the service of John Jr. Two descendants of John the son of John Jr. the revolutionary soldier occupy portions of the estate at Branford – Charles Augustus and Reuel.



PART II


Lineage of Stephen Foot Blackstone and Anna
Wilford Blackstone and of their descendants.




1st Generation Richard
Wilford


Richard Wilford born 1653
died 1734

Elizabeth born 1693
died 1758
Married
Children
Richard Wilford born
John
Joseph Feb. 3, 1715
Elizabeth
Lydia
Mary
Sarah
Anna
Abigail



2nd Generation Richard
Wilford Joseph
Edward


Joseph Wilford born Feb. 3, 1715/16
died Sept. 8, 1770
Elizabeth How born
died
Married Dec. 19, 1750
Children
Joseph Wilford born May 26, 1755
John Feb. 11, 1762
Abigail (M. Benjamin Maltby) Mar. 11, 1752
Hannah (Farrington Harrison) Feb. 9, 1754
Elizabeth (Russell Baker) July 12, 1757
Rebecca (Wareham Williams) Oct. 12, 1765
Anna Apr. 24, 1767



5th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.


Stephen Foot Blackstone born Dec. 3, 1772
died Jan. 14, 1862
Anna Wilford born Apr. 24, 1767
died March 7, 1813
Married Jan. 23, 1793
Children
Stephen Blackstone born March 16, 1794
John Wilford Oct. 18, 1796
Beverly Apr. 2, 1802
Franklin July 31, 1808
Joseph died (single)
Ralph " "
Anna " May 17, 1817



6th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen


Stephen Blackstone born March 16, 1794
died Dec. 5, 1878
Elizabeth Terryberry born Dec. 2, 1799
died Sept. 5, 1887
Married Jan. 4, 1818
Children
William Blackstone born Nov. 27, 1818
Harriet Nov. 16, 1822
Luzette June 5, 1830
Anna Sept. 9, 1820
Edward July 24, 1824
Sarah April 23, 1832
Mary E. Dec. 12, 1837
Beverly April 11, 1826
Eliza Jane Oct. 13, 1840
Stephen Dec. 4, 1835
" " (single) died Feb. 28, 1858



6th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
John W.


John Wilford Blackstone born Oct. 18, 1796
died Oct. 15, 1868
Catherine Hammond wid. born Dec. 26, 1806
born Tomlinson died Oct. 18, 1865
Married Apr. 4, 1833
Children
Theodore E. Blackstone born Jan. 4, 1834
John W. Dec. 22, 1835
Joseph Dec. 17, 1839
Augustus Dec. 21, 1841
Janette Aug. 31, 1844
Isabel Aug., 1837
(single) died
Eugene " born
(single) died

6th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Beverly



Beverly Blackstone born Aug. 2, 1802
died Jan. 3, 1861
Elizabeth Blissett born July 30, 1817
died Aug. 16, 1887
Children
Stephen Blackstone born Jan. 17, 1838
Martha Ann Sept. 11, 1839
Abba Jane Jan. 27, 1844
Mary Sept. 8, 1840
" died Aug. 16, 1841



6th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Franklin


Franklin Blackstone born Apr. 22, 1808
died Nov. 1, 1885
Elizabeth Parker born June 9, 1812
died Nov. 19, 1886
Married March 6, 1830
Children
Anna Blackstone born April 25, 1834
Mary Nov. 5, 1835
Betty J. March 18, 1838
Harriet Dec. 28, 1845
Evert Sep. 3, 1831
Frank E. May 17, 1846
Joseph R. Jan. 28, 1837
died March, 1849
Stephen F. born Feb. 16, 1840
died 1859



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
William


William Blackstone born Nov. 27, 1818
died March 27, 1883
Eunace A. Rychman born July 29, 1819
died
Married Sept. 26, 1839
Children
Elizabeth Ann Blackstone born Sept. 26, 1840
Clara Maria June 13, 1842
Rachel Ryckman June 15, 1844
Sara Jane March 21, 1845
Stephen July 30, 1848
Leeman E. Jan. 20, 1857
James Madison Feb. 17, 1860
Silance Ward Jan. 26, 1853
Harriet Josephine Sept. 8, 1851
George July 30, 1848
" (single) died May 1, 1896



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Harriet


Harriet Blackstone born Nov. 16, 1822
died
George Van Every born Sept. 23, 1821
died June 8, 1899
Married Sept. 19, 1841
Children
William Van Every born March 1, 1845
David March 18, 1852
Keziah May 14, 1842



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Anna


Anna Blackstone born Sept. 9, 1820
died Feb. 14, 1854
John C. Smith born March 24, 1821
died Oct. 23, 1897
Married Sept. 19, 1841
Children
Margaret E. Smith born Dec. 24, 1842
A. Wilford Sept. 3, 1844
Mary J. Jan. 1, 1851



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Beverly


Beverly Blackstone born April 11, 1826
died Nov. 29, 1904

Anna E. Crossley born May 18, 1841
died
Married Feb. 2, 1859
Children
Mary Jane Blackstone born Dec. 12, 1859
Edyth Penelope June 1, 1863
Raymond Sept. 1, 1867
Anne Josephine March 15, 1861
" " " died in infancy



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Edward


Edward Blackstone born July 24, 1824
died Apr. 16, 1866
Mary Matilda Kirtendall born March 29, 1827
died Nov. 7, 1883
Married Dec. 28, 1847
Children
Elbert Leroy Blackstone born Aug. 6, 1849
Medora Amilda Jan. 26, 1852
Amilda Jane Aug. 8, 1853
Otis Irvine May 6, 1855
George Wesley May 10, 1857
Charles Sylvester Jan. 22, 1860
Warren W. Feb. 22, 1862
Nancy Elizabeth Apr. 17, 1864
Charlotte Ann July 12, 1865
Edward Aug. 28, 1866



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Mary E.


Mary E. Blackstone born Dec. 12, 1837
died
Jakob Blaine born
died
Married about 1857



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Eliza Jane


Eliza Jane Blackstone born Oct. 13, 1840
died

William Crossley born
died Aug. 15, 1887
Married
Children



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Luzette


Luzette Blackstone born June 5,1830
died

Smith born
died
Married
Children



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Sarah


Sarah Blackstone born Apr. 23, 1832
died March 25, 1876
William Dingman born
died
Married
Children
Celina E. Blackstone born Jan. 11, 1853
Edgar



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
John W.
Augustus


Augustus Blackstone born Dec. 21, 1841
died
Mary Jane Richardson born May 29, 1848
died
Married Sept. 1, 1870
Children
Adelbert L. Blackstone born Nov. 16, 1871
Bertrand A. Nov. 25, 1873



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
John W.
John W.


John W. Blackstone born Dec. 22, 1835
died
Ellen E. Hardy born Oct. 28, 1843
died
Married June 20, 1861
Children
Roccabel Blackstone born March 28, 1862
Jessie E. Oct. 28, 1867
John W. Oct. 29, 1870
Ralph H. Apr. 16, 1880



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
John W.
Jeanette


Jeanette Blackstone born Aug. 31, 1844
died

Henry A. Beckwith born Nov. 3, 1840
died
Married Dec. 22, 1869
Children
Frank H. Beckwith born Feb. 3, 1872
Charles A. April 23, 1874
Joseph W. May 1, 1876
Ethnel A. May 17, 1877
Henry G. Nov. 8, 1881
Blanche B. June 6, 1883
Maude J. Sept. 6, 1888
David D. Feb. 12, 1891



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
John W.
Joseph


Joseph Blackstone born Dec. 17, 1839
died
Mary Emma Poole born Feb. 23, 1848
died
Married Jan. 3, 1867
Children
Wilford R. Blackstone born Nov. 11, 1868
Jeanette Sept. 16, 1867
Herbert L. Aug. 13, 1870
Joseph R. Aug. 29, 1874
Eva M. May 27, 1873
Samuel L. Jan. 18, 1877



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
John W.
Theodore E.


Theodore E. Blackstone born Jan. 4, 1834
died

Mary E. Hardy born 1833
died
Married 1855
Children
Ernest W. Blackstone born 1857
Harry R. April 1, 1861
John D. 1863
Mary B. 1865
Daisie 1867
Katherine I. Sept. 16, 1871
Theo. E. 1873
Leroy 1879
Josie E. 1879



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Beverly
Stephen


Stephen Blackstone born Jan. 17, 1838
died
Mahala E. Smith born Jan. 25, 1843
died
Married March 2, 1866
Children
Elizabeth Blackstone born July 6, 1868
George R. Dec. 14, 1875
Nettie G. Jan. 24, 1877
Beverly Dec. 27, 1866
Clara Sept. 14, 1880



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Beverly
Martha Ann


Martha Ann Blackstone born Sept. 11, 1839
died
John White born
died
Married March 15, 1860
Children
Wilford B. White born June 12, 1861
Phoebe Apr. 11, 1863
May Aug. 1, 1865
Malissa



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Beverly
Abba Jane


Abba Jane Blackstone born Jan. 27, 1844
died
Norris H. Johnston born Aug. 27, 1843
died
Married Feb. 10, 1869
Children
Stephen E. Johnston born Dec. 13, 1870
Sara I. May 8, 1873
Charlie G. July 27, 1875
Oliver P. May 1, 1877
Mary B. Aug. 18, 1879
Anna March 18, 1884



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Franklin
Evert


Evert Blackstone born Sept. 3, 1851
died
Alice Binns born Sept. 9, 1870
died Jan. 14, 1897
Married March 26, 1889
Children
Nina L. Blackstone born Feb. 21, 1890
Betty L. Aug. 14, 1893
Florence H. Aug. 1, 1896
died Dec. 26, 1896


7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Franklin
Harriet


Harriet Blackstone born Dec. 28, 1845
died
Homer Miller born June 27, 1835
died
Married Feb. 4, 1873
Children



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Franklin
Anna


Anna Blackstone born Apr. 25, 1884
died Feb. 1896
James M. Irving born May 20, 1825
died June 2, 1890
Married Apr. 4, 1855
Children
James M. Irving born July 21, 1867
died May 26, 1870
Elizabeth born Dec. 25, 1864
died Apr. 24, 1865
Jennie A. born Jan. 4, 1856
died Apr. 25, 1879
George Blackstone born Aug. 10, 1869



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Franklin
Mary


Mary Blackstone born Nov. 5, 1835
died
Emery born
died
Married
Children
Hattie Emery born
Gay
Evert
May
Ernest
Edgar
Sherman
Josie
Alta



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Franklin
Frank E.


Frank E. Blackstone born May 17, 1746
died
Nancy Emeline Hardgrove born Oct. 10, 185_
died
Married Oct. 10, 1871
Children
Hattie May Blackstone born Nov. 27, 188



7th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Franklin
Elizabeth


Elizabeth J. Blackstone born March 18, 1838
died Feb. 20, 1896
David E. Black born Oct. 27, 1834
died
Married Oct. 29, 1854
Children
Tanjor T. Black born Oct. 23, 1856
Mile Reuben (single) 1858
Dora B. July 17, 1860
Silvia May 1862
Joseph S. (single)
Stephen (dead)
David (dead)
Bessie H. born Jan. 22, 1873
Frank (dead, single)



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
William
Stephen

Stephen Blackstone born July 30, 1848
died
Harriet A. Simmons born Jan. 13, 1856
died
Married Nov. 4, 1873
Children
Isabel Blackstone born Nov. 2, 1874
Leone Nov. 18, 1876
Nettye July 2, 1882
Ada Sept. 1, 1884



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
William
Elizabeth


Elizabeth A. Blackstone born Sept. 26, 1840
died

1) Joseph Ryan born Aug. 31, 1843
died
Married Feb. 17, 1874
2) Samuel Atkin Married Dec. 23, 1896
Children
Sarah Josephine Ryan born Jan 27, 1877
Eunice Augusta Jan. 12, 1881



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
William
Silance W.

Silance Ward Blackstone born Jan. 26, 1853
died

Wm. H. McMillan born May 1, 1851
died Nov. 4, 1906
Married Dec. 24, 1874
Children
Harry A. McMillan born Sept. 28, 1875
Frank W. Apr. 9, 1877
William C. July 18, 1879
Chauncey C. July 17, 1881
Clara C. Feb. 21, 1888
Alvah A. Aug. 8, 1890
Eunice A. March 5, 1894



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
William
Clara M.

Clara M. Blackstone born June 13, 1842
died
William Thompson Adams born Aug. 21, 1838
died
Married Dec. 25, 1864
Children
George W. Adams born Oct. 3, 1865
John Q. Nov. 8, 1867
Charles Blackstone Dec. 24, 1870
Clara Josephine Nov. 21, 1877



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Beverly
Edyth P.

Edyth P. Blackstone born June 1, 1863
died
Everett J. Doolittle born July 2, 1859
died
Married Dec. 20, 1883
Children



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Edward
Warren W.

Warren W. Blackstone born Feb. 22, 1862
died
Clara N. Sawyer born Aug. 31, 1865
died
Married July 2, 1889
Children
Nellie Pearl Blackstone born Apr. 2, 1890
Earl Glenwood July 9, 1892
Gracie Leone Sept. 27, 1893
Elbert L. March 27, 1892
Charles S. Oct. 13, 1896



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Beverly
Mary Jane


Mary Jane Blackstone born Dec. 12, 1859
died
Charles C. Abbott born March 13, 1853
died
Married Jan. 29, 1881
Children



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Edward
Charles S.

Charles S. Blackstone born Jan. 22, 1860
died
Jennie D. Castlow born Jan 27, 1864
died
Married Nov. 26, 1885
Children
Clyde L. Blackstone born Nov. 3, 1886
Walter E. Aug. 18, 1888
Nellie M. June 15, 1892
died May 3, 1894
Charles S. born Oct. 30, 1895
died Apr. 7, 1896



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
Dingman John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Sarah
Celina Dingman

Celina E. Dingman born Jan. 11, 1853
died
Silas W. Allen born June 9, 1845
died
Married March 8, 1870
Children
George E. Allen born Nov. 28, 1870
Frank March 24, 1873
Sarah S. Jan. 11, 1874
Willie D. Oct. 15, 1884
Charles W. June 25, 1879
Roy E, May 17, 1882
Hugh S. May 27, 1890



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
Dingman John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Sarah
Edgar Dingman

Edgar Dingman born about 1857
died
Wife unknown born
died
Married about 1880
Children



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
William
Rachel

Rachel Blackstone born June 15, 1844
died
Marion Hamilton born March 31, 1846
died
Married Dec. 24, 1865
Children
Thomas Blackstone Hamilton born Dec. 11, 1866
Gussie Feb 20, 1868
Clara Alma Aug. 10, 1871
Mary Olive Jan. 22, 1875
Fanny Gail Dec. 23, 1878
Ward Ryckman Nov. 11, 1880



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
Van Every John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Harriet
William Van Every

William Van Every born March 1, 1845
died
Armina C. Williams born Oct. 18, 1847
died
Married Aug. 30, 1863
Children
George W. Van Every born June 7, 1865
William E. Nov. 26, 1868
Hattie (died single) Feb. 5, 1867
Luther (died single) Oct. 5, 1870
Ella Nov. 4, 1873
Frank A. July 24, 1877
Lewis E. Oct. 16, 1880
Emery Apr. 8, 1875



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Beverly
Raymond

Raymond Blackstone born Sept. 1, 1867
died
Rose Anna Flurie born May 17, 1870
died
Married Sept. 15, 1892
Children
Leroy Blackstone born Aug. 1, 1893
Leslie Jan. 4, 1896
Lawrence Feb. 14, 1899
Anna Sept. 5, 1901
Raymond March 22, 1904


8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
William
Sarah J.

Sarah Jane Blackstone born March 21, 1846
died
Charles Crossley born June 10, 1843
died
Married Dec, 16, 1868
Children
Charles W. Crossley born Nov. 30, 1869
Fred Alien June 28, 1871
William Blackstone Nov.5, 1877
Sarah Helen Apr. 17, 1881



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
Van Every John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Harriet
Kesiah Van Every

Kesiah Van Every born May 14, 1842
died
William Reed born
died
Married 1859
Children
George Reed born
James (died in infancy)
Angus
Ida
Hattie (died in infancy)
Unknown



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
Van Every John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
Harriet
David Van Every

David Van Every born March 18, 1852
died
Annie Goldborough born Nov. 25, 1856
died
Married Aug. 30, 1872
Children
Hattie M. Van Every born Sept. 29, 1873
George W. Apr. 9, 1875
Josephine March 2, 1877



8th Generation William
Blackstone John
John
John Jr.
Stephen F.
Stephen
William
Leamon

Leamon Blackstone born Jan. 20, 1857
died
Elizabeth Glindnining born Aug. 17, 1858
died
Married Feb. , 1880
Children
Lloyd Blackstone born Nov. 7, 1880
Harry Ward May 1, 1882
Maud Aug. 8, 1883
Frank Leamon July 27, 1885
William Glindining June 12, 1887
Josie June 5, 1889
Gladys Ione July 16, 1891
died Nov. 15, 1896
Alvin born June 3, 1893
Earl Paul Jan. 9, 1896







HISTORY OF
Stephen Foot Blackstone and of Anna Wilford
Blackstone and their descendants.





RICHARD WILFORD.


Richard Wilford was the agent of John of London, probably a relative. John of London was the nephew of the first John Wilford who settled in New Haven in 1644. He was a merchant. He removed to Branford some time prior to 1663. He was a member of the General Court (Legislative) of Connecticut in 1665 and served nineteen sessions. He died in 1678. By his will he gave his property to John Wilford of London, after the death of his wife. Richard was sent over by John to look after the estate. He died in 1734 and left a widow, Elizabeth, three sons and six daughters. He was a surveyor and held the tittle of "Salter". He bequeathed his instrument to his son Richard. His son Richard died single and his son John without issue.




JOSEPH WILFORD


Joseph Wilford was the son of Richard Wilford and married Elizabeth How Dec. 19, 1750. He had a son Joseph Wilford who was a Lieutenant of the 3rd Camp (Branford) 2nd Reg. Coun. Militia. These were commonly known as "Minute Men" and were to answer immediately any alarms. His daughter Anna Wilford married Stephen Foot Blackstone.




STEPHEN FOOT BLACKSTONE


Since the day historians moulded tablets of clay and burned therein the carved records of their times, the history of the world has been but the chronicle of anointed Kings, humans and inhuman and their creatures and satellites. Countless millions of human beings were but as dust under their feet and their records is dust.

For centuries a principle lies germinating in the mental and moral subsoil of the human race and then a length it springs to beneficent flower. The record is in the depths below, so also from that lower plane cycles of gestating human thought and passion is born the child who in time shall tread the path of Statecraft, or Science, or of Art, or any path that leads to human advancement or progress with a instinct that man call genius. His record is also below. The principle and the man are stalk and the fruit, the roots are in humanity. Every record of the individuals who compose the mighty germinating soil beneath is of vital interest; and so also if the writer shall in this relation recite incidents seemingly trifling and insignificant, he has no apology to offer.

Stephen Foot Blackstone was born at the town of Branford, Connecticut, on the 3rd day of Dec. 1772. The home in which he was born is still standing in good preservation. There he grew to manhood in a family of eight children, six boys and two girls one of the chief incidents of his boyhood is related in the life of his father.

The nest was becoming crowded. Some of the fledglings must find a hew home. In the year 1792, while he was yet in his twentieth year, Stephen with a companion, a Mr. Lindsley, made his way to the town of Madison, in Madison Co., New York. It was a wilderness place, some twenty or thirty miles south west from Utica, which at that time was a bare Hamlet. Here they spent the summer, and cleared a small field. They built a log house on the land and perhaps cut some fodder and stored it for future use. Blackstone must have worked diligently: but every sinew of his powerful frame – he was over six feet in height – was stimulated by the hope and that passion which moves the world. Late that fall he returned to Branford and on the 23rd day of January 1793 he led sweet Anna Wilford to the alter. He was barely turned twenty one, while she was five years his senior. Now began the battle of life. Few in these days of prosperity even among those who call themselves poor are housed, clothed and fed luxuriously compared with those of only one hundred years ago. In one large sled, probably built by himself, Blackstone loaded the furniture, food, clothing and tools should equip them in their first campaign. A yoke of strong oxen moved them to that lonely cabin in the forest.
It was primitive beginning; but oh! The love and courage that made winter winds seem pleasant and steep hills as level ground. It was surely a simple homely wedding tour that Anna Wilford took. Days were spent in the tedious journey. Rude wayside inns sheltered them at night and hope brightened the day.

When at length the lonely cabin in a wintry forest marked the end of their pilgrimage, it took all their courage to enable them to look through the dark veil of the present to the happy prosperous future beyond. It is such strength as theirs, such love and courage as theirs, that has hewed away the forest, bridged the rivers, planted homes and reared men and women until there is no more frontier, and has given Uncle Sam’s domain the proud tittle "America".

Soon the long prepared faggots blazed in the wide fireplace. The high piled conveyance was unpacked, and tables and chairs, bed and bureau, and the hundred little furnishing which thoughtful foresight, or the loving kindness of parents, brothers and sisters and faithful friends had provided, brought the old home and new home close together. Here for twenty one years these faithful hearts wrought. The dark present that met them passed away and the happy prosperous days were theirs. Brothers and sisters filled this home, as they had helped to fill the home the home they had left. The forest moved away before the echoing stroke of the axe. A new home more pretentious and more comfortable took place of the humble roof which sheltered their beginnings. Then the faithful friend of all mankind called to the loving wife and mother, and she went to another new home built not with hands.

In those first days as patch after patch of land was cleared it was planted to wheat and rye and corn and furnished food for man and beast; vegetables for summer and winter use; and some favorable acre or two was planted to hops and these with the yearly output of cheese, furnished all the ready money the first settlers saw. For apples they went miles away to where Missionaries among the Indians had planted orchards and bought of them their winter’s supply. The forest furnished abundant honey. When a bee tree was found it would be chopped down at night and a section containing the swam would be cut out, the ends covered and it would be carried home and set up and became what all frontier lads knew as "Bee Gum". One swarm found on a bush was carried home in Grandfather’s hat tied up in his bandana handkerchief. At another time he discovered bees passing and repassing from a hole in a tree not far distant. A day or two later a swarm left the home hive and made directly for this tree. The bees seen first were a advance guard preparing a home for the swarm.

The writer relates these simple things because he too was raised so far on the frontier that he never saw a locomotive until he was eighteen years old, and when a lad has seen his father carry home a swarm of bees found in the wilderness and yet he learned the Greek alphabet on the same father’s knee.

The grand children will read these things if the gray beards do not, and this is a family record, for the family when the "Cotters Saturday Night" and "The Deserted Village" shall cease to be classics such homely records will cease to have readers.

When the wheat and rye and corn were cut and bound, a place was cleared and on it a platform of rails was laid, and on this the unbound grain. Then was heard the whir and muffled beat of that primitive thrashing machine the Flail". When grain and chaff was separated from the stalks, it was winnowed in a favoring breeze, until the clean golden grain lay upon the sheet spread to receive it. Yonder miles away on some lonely stream some enterprising millwright had built a gristmill. The writer when a lad has visited such a one built seventy years ago in the frontier wilds of Illinois. Wheel and shaft, driven and pinion in fact everything about the mill except the bolt for separating the flour from the bran and shorts, and a very few pounds of metal, was carved out of hand seasoned Oak or Maple. From here went out the flour and rye and injun to all the settlers for miles around.

When Grandfather had finished his thrashing of perhaps twenty bushels each of wheat and rye a bag of each was tied to the yoke on his oxen, and they were led to mill through the forest where the only sign of a road was the Blaze on the trees, to such a mill as I described. Again the bags were filled with flour and meal, and stored where neither hunger should come in at the door nor love fly out at the window.

In a few years the country became settled. Many came from Connecticut, Edward Blackstone, Stephen's brother settled in Oneida County near Clinton where some of the family still lives.

Ebenezer settled in Jefferson County near Watertown and is buried at East Rodman, and is still represented there. One of his descendants is the noted Evangelist, William E, Blackstone of Oak Park, Chicago. James Barker, a nephew settled in Madison. Barker's wife was a Thompson. Mrs. John Gray of Darlington, Wis., was her sister. Mrs. Gray was the mother of H. H. Gray of Darlington Wisconsin, who was State Senator and well and favorably known all over the state.

As the county of Madison grew, Blackstone grew with it, or rather in advance of it. He was broad and liberal in his views, and every enterprise looking to public benefits and involving public spirit found in him a firm and steadfast advocate. He helped build schools and churches, and was an ardent promoter and patron of Hamilton College established at Clinton, Oneida County not many miles from his home. During many years he was Magistrate for his county. In those days it was the law or custom for the presiding District Judge, when he held court in any county in the district to call two of the leading Magistrates of the County who sat with him on the bench and presided with him in open court. For many years Mr. Blackstone so sat and thereby earned the title of Judge.

The writer heard his father relate an incident which occurred on that home farm which caught his boyish memory, and showed what stuff was in the blood. The father was going with the two eldest boys, Stephen and John to a timber lot to direct some cutting. As they crossed a wide treeless meadow, the father a few paces in advance, they suddenly heard behind them, the fearful roar of a maddened bull. Turning quickly they saw the huge beast charging down upon them. The axe quickly slipped into the hands of the boys. By stages the frightful thing advanced, stopped at intervals to till the air with the dust of his pawing and with blood curdling bellowing. Then the father's command rang out clear and strong. Boys, stand a little apart and stand firm, when he reaches you he will pause a second and drop his head to charge, then strike". The last twenty yards he came straight on, head and horns and tail swinging in the air, the very embodiment of brutal rage. On he came and they felt his breath as for one short second he dropped his head to charge. In that second like a flash the boys darted forward and two gleaming axe blades were buried out of sight in the angry swollen neck of the frothing monster. He sank to his knees. The battle was over. Those boys of fifteen and seventeen heard the commands and obeyed. It is the spirit, which makes the American Soldier and Sailor behind the gun dangerous and invincible.

There was something else. Deep down in the subconsiousness of those lads was the thought of the father a few steps away defenseless.

When the Erie Canal was projected, Blackstone was one of its most ardent advocates. To his friends who opposed to it on account of the great time it would take to build it, and the immense sum it would cost he said - Gentlemen I will live to see this canal built, and will see grain from beyond the Mississippi River floated by here to a market in New York City". - And he did. Some years after the death of his wife, he took for a second wife a Mrs. Cook who had sons of her own, and on relinquishment to his son Franklin the charge of the old homestead, he removed to the village of Clinton, where he lived many years in the companionship of friends, and the care of his garden.

At length Franklin with his family found a home in the west not far from his brothers Stephen and John, and at the age of over eighty years the father followed. For sometime he lived with his son John. It was more congenial for him at his son Stephen's on account of religious matters and there the evening of his life was spent. He died at the age of eighty-nine years two months and eleven days.

At his son John's even at that age assumed exclusive charge of the wood house and garden; and woe to the Grandson who intruded at either place. An abundance of vegetable was brought to the house, but the boy who got a melon or other vegetables except as Grandfather pulled it, got it as boys sometimes do, and tried to leave no trail. He was a man over six feet in height, spare and muscular, his forehead was high, his eyes gray blue with bushy hanging brows, a nose like a eagle beak, a firm projecting chin, the two later features in later life, suggesting to lads who had read Holmes, a certain description which he gives; the smile provoked however, still left in youth hearts the veneration, which such a strong character inspires. He lies in the little graveyard of Mt. Hope Church with many of his people.




STEPHEN BLACKSTONE


Stephen Blackstone, the eldest son of Stephen Foot Blackstone, was born on the old homestead in Madison Co., N. Y. He assisted his father in clearing the home farm which was heavily timbered and followed the usual life of a farmer a boy until he reached the age of eighteen year. He then started out to seek his fortune. He located near the city of Hamilton, Canada. Whether he went by boat from Watertown, Jefferson Co., where he had relatives or across the country is unknown. The place where he located is between Hamilton and Dundas, and near the foot of the mountain, so called. He was married here, to Elizabeth Terryberry, Jan. 4, 1818. A family of ten boys and girls followed this union, four boys and six girls. about the year 1853 Stephen sold the fine property which he had accumulated in Canada, and moving to Wisconsin near his brother John, he bought about six hundred acres of splendid land. He improved it by a fine stone house, built and repaired out buildings, made gardens and planted orchards, and soon enjoyed the ownership of one of the very finest farms in the country. All the children except Luzette came with him or followed and surrounded the central home. What sources of contentment and happiness a man may have. He had, and he was cheerfully thankful for it. He was a man of deep religious feeling, and the family altar fires were never suffered to die out. He was largely instrumental in building upon his farm a neat stone church where the neighborhood might worship. His wife shared his religious feelings; his children and Grandchildren and his nephews loved to be there. Several Grand children were almost reared by Aunt Betsy. Stephen loved horses, and took risks too great for a man of eighty years. At the age of eighty-four years, seven months and nineteen days he passed away and sleeps peacefully in Mt. Hope churchyard, beside his father and faithful wife, who passed to meet him at the age of Eighty-seven years, ten months and three days.




JOHN WILFORD BLACKSTONE


John Wilford Blackstone in the history of whose life in interwoven much of the early history of south western Wisconsin was born in Madison Co., N.Y., the second son of Stephen Foot Blackstone, a descendant of William Blackstone, the first white settler on the site of the city of Boston, Mass. He assisted his father in clearing a heavily wooded farm in the town of his birth and received his early education as opportunity offered. He prepared for college with the resident minister, and entered Hamilton College at Clinton, NY. In 1815. His diploma shows that he was graduated 1819. In the last year of his college life he engaged with a merchant by the name of Hart, and together they loaded keel boats at Olean Point NY., with merchandize and proceeded down the Allegheny River, the Ohio and Mississippi as far as Vicksburg selling goods at the small towns along the way. Cincinnati was at that time a small town of about twelve hundred inhabitants. The return trip was made by skiff and on horse back.

On the return Mr. Blackstone studied medicine after having received his degree from Hamilton College. He also studied law and was admitted to the bar. He made his first location at Hamilton, Canada, whither his brother Stephen had already proceeded him, and where his brothers Ralph and Joseph died unmarried. After some two or three years he again started from Olean Point at the head water of the Allegheny River, this time in a skiff in company with James Hammond. They passed down the Allegheny and Ohio Rivers until they reached Shaweetown, Ill., where at that time there was quite a settlement, and a plant for the manufacture of salt. Just about this time the lead mining at Galena, Ill. and vicinity including all south western Wisconsin, north western Illinois and portions of Iowa opposite across the Mississippi River began to attract wide attention. Great numbers of men were flocking thither in the speedily winning fortunes. Blackstone and Hammond who had now become united in marriage with Miss Catherine Tomlinson joined the army of adventures and passed the first winter near Elizabeth, Jo. Daviess Co., Ill. Blackstone's mining partner at that place, whose name cannot now be given, was also a college graduate and fortunately had brought with him his college text books. These furnished the young men with their reading, and with much profit to themselves they reviewed their college work during the long winter evenings.

After varying fortune in mining both good and bad, but mostly bad, about 1834 Blackstone purchased a farm, with quite a large two story log house upon it, in the town of White Oak Spring La Fayette Co., Wis. For several years this was the only rendezvous for social functions in that early day, and men & women came miles mostly on horseback, to meet and greet old friends. Music and dancing sped the time and sometimes three days would elapse before all the guests parted. Blackstone met with success at farming and at his death owned 1500 acres of fine land, much of it valuable mining land, the royal ties from which was the chief source of his fortune.

Mr. Blackstone was associated Judge under the territory of Michigan of the large mining district included in Iowa Co. He was elected to the territorial legislature of Wisconsin in 1837 from Iowa Co. and was speaker of the first territorial legislature held in Madison, Wis. in 1838.

For many years he was chairman of the town board of his town and often chairman of the county board. He was Justice of the peace nearly all the years he lived in White Oak Springs.

During the Blackhawk War he held a Lieutenants Commission in Capt. Clarks Co. and was stationed at Galena.

On April 4, 1833 Blackstone was married to Mrs. Catherine Hammond, widow of his former companion James Hammond. She was born in Rocking Ham, North Carolina and passed her early life in that state and in Tennessee and Kentucky. Her maiden name was Catherine Tomlinson and her father and two brothers were with Jackson behind the Cotton Bales at New Orleans where General Packington received such a bloody repulse. Mrs. Hammond brought him two stepsons Alexander and Charles and one step daughter who was afterwards the wife of Samuel Henderson Scales of the North Carolina Family which furnished that state a governor. She brought Mr. Blackstone five sons and two daughters.

John Wilford Blackstone was prominent in all the affairs of his part of the state from its earliest settlement to the time of his death Oct. 15, 1868. As one of the men who helped to lay the foundation for the great state of Wisconsin, men of broad minds, wide experience and in very many cases of high scholastic attainments, his name often appears on the records of Town, County and State. He was a man of great self control, and of calm cool judgement, and through a long life he enjoyed the confidence and respect of all good men with whom he came in contact with. Of powerful build physically and of resolute courage he won from the wilderness a handsome competency and at the ripe age of seventy two entered upon his last pilgrimage honored and beloved by all good people.




BEVERLY BLACKSTONE


Beverly Blackstone was born on the old homestead in Madison Co., N.Y. He grew to manhood there and remained there until about the age of thirty five years. He never was in robust health. about the year 1837 he was married to Elizabeth Blissett and gathering his belongings he migrated to La Fayette Co. Wis., and made his home for two or three years on the farm of his brother John where his children Stephen and Martha were born. He removed again to McDonough Co. Ill., and located at a place now called Pennington Point. He followed the business of drover and brought herds of animals into the Galena head mine district where a ready market was found. He brought the first steel plow to that region that that were ever seen there. He died at his home age 58 years 5 months and one day.




FRANKLIN BLACKSTONE


Franklin Blackstone was born on the old homestead in Madison, N.Y. and lived there until about the age of 45 years. In the year 1853 he moved with his family to the home of his bother John in Wis. Soon a farm was found for them. The bothers came and brought their boys, a field and garden was ploughed and planted, the wife and girls with some help, moved in their belongings and soon they had a new home. Grief came too. Joseph a fine handsome lad of eleven years was stricken with brain fever and died. The next year a place was bought near Millville, Ill. and the family moved thither. He was married March 6, 1830 to Elizabeth Parker. Eight children were born to them of whom five are living. This Aunt Betsey was a lovely women. Franklin ended his journey at the age of seventy Years six months and nine days.




WILLIAM BLACKSTONE


William Blackstone was the eldest son of Stephen Blackstone and was born near Dundas Ontario, Nov 27, 1818. He married Eunice A. Ryckman Sept. 26, 1839. He came to Wisconsin sometime after the family came, and bought a farm near his father where his family grew to maturity. Later he moved to Chapin, Iowa. He died there and his widow still lives there at a advanced age with her unmarried daughter Josephine who takes care of her.




HARRIET BLACKSTONE


Harriet Blackstone is the daughter of Stephen and grand daughter of Stephen Foot Blackstone. She was married in Canada to George Van Every Sept. 19, 1841. She came to Wisconsin sometime after her father and settled near him. The family have all left and moved to other states, but she has a little home in Apple River, Ill. and a little income and she lives by herself as contented as the first Blackstone did at Rehoboth and had all of his independence at eighty odd years of age.




ANNA BLACKSTONE


Anna Blackstone was the daughter of Stephen Blackstone and was born in Canada Sept. 9, 1820. She was married to John C. Smith near Hamilton, Canada Sept. 19, 1841. Her husband was the son of Dr. Smith who several times represented his district in the Canadian Parliament. She died at Monticello, Wis. Feb. 14, 1845 and is buried at Mt. Hope Churchyard. The husband died Oct. 23, 1897 in Canada.




BEVERLY BLACKSTONE


Beverly Blackstone was the son of Stephen Blackstone. He was born in Canada Apr. 11, 1826. He married Annie E. Crossley Feb. 2, 1859. He was always in feeble health, but lived to be nearly eighty years of age. He was a farmer, machinist and inventor. Two married daughters and a son together with the widow survived him. Their address is Sioux City, Iowa.




MARY E. BLACKSTONE


Was born in Canada. She came west with the family. She was educated at the common school and at Platteville Academy Wis. She returned to Canada and was there married to Jacob Blaine. She died soon after without leaving issue. She was daughter of Stephen.




SARAH BLACKSTONE


Sarah Blackstone, daughter of Stephen Blackstone was married to William Dingman and lived in the town of Monticello near her father until her death March 25, 1876. Two children are known to survive. Celina Allen of Wathena Kansas and Edgar, residence unknown.




AUGUSTUS BLACKSTONE


Augustus Blackstone, fourth son of John Wilford Blackstone was born on the home farm in White Oak Springs and is now the owner of it. He followed the usual life of a farmer's boy and attended an Academy at Hazel Green. Greatly enlarged the home farm by clearing of heavy timber. After the wife died in 1904 he has made his home with his son Albert in Waukesha Wis. and Bertram in Chicago.




JOHN W. BLACKSTONE


John W. Blackstone was born at the old homestead Dec. 22, 1835. He married Ellen E. Hardy, sister of the brother Theodore's widow, June 20, 1861 and has four children. Jessie E. is principle of the Prescott School, Anaconda, Montana. Ralph H. is freight conductor on the Milwaukee R.R. from Minneapolis to La Crosse Wis. He provides the home for his aged parents. John Wilford Blackstone was elected Judge of La Fayette Co., Wis. at the age of twenty five years and held the office eight years. Was elected State Attorney for two years. Was Assemblyman for the county in 1879, and was State Senator for the year 1880 - 81. He was educated at Platteville Academy, Beloit College and Brown University R.I. Has been engaged in the practice of law, and in mining and farming. Served the government three years in pension office. His post Office address is 1909 15 Ave. South, Minneapolis, Minn.




JEANETTE BLACKSTONE


Jeanette Blackstone was the daughter of John W. Blackstone and was born on the old homestead in White Oak Spring Aug 31, 1844. Upon her mother's death she took care of the household and of her father until he died. After his death she was united in marriage with Henry A. Beckwith whose mother was a member of the Proctor Family of Vermont and New Hampshire. After the marriage they made a home for themselves on 320 acres of the old farm. Joseph, a son is a veterinary surgeon and stockman, has a section of land in Canada and run the farm with Henry and Dave. Maud is yet at home with her mother.




JOSEPH BLACKSTONE


Joseph Blackstone was born in the town of White Oak Spring, Wis on the 17th day of Dec. 1839. He was educated in the Home School and at Platteville Academy, Wis. In 1862 he enlisted in Co. K, Wis. Inf Vols. He was Sergeant Major of the Reg. and was elected Lieutenant of Co. B. His first engagement was a Prairie Grove, Ark., not far from where his southern Uncles and Cousins lived. He was severely wounded in that engagement, a ball having passed from the right shoulder to the elbow, fortunately not shattering the bone. He did not leave the regiment. He was through the siege of Vicksburg. His regiment was one to receive the surrender of Fort Morgan in Mobile Bay, was at the capture of Fort Spanish and was mustered out at Galveston, Texas, July 14, 1865. On his return he was married to Emma Pool and engaged in farming, and after in mining and lumbering at Shullsburg, Wis.

His son Ray is in the office of the Amalgamated in Anaconda. His daughter Eva is Accountant in the large business of her brother-in-law Wm. H. Look.




THEODORE E. BLACKSTONE

was the eldest son of John W. Blackstone and Catherine Blackstone. He followed farming in Wis. until 1890 when he removed to Chinook Mont. He was educated at Platteville Academy. In 1855 he was married to Mary E. Hardy at Platteville, Wis. There are nine living children of this union. On his marriage he engaged in farming. He also studied medicine and for sometime conducted a drug store at Shullsburg, Wis. about the year 1890 he migrated to Chinook Mont. And took a homestead. He died there shortly after and is buried at Helena Montana. Of the family, Ernest is Advertising Agent for a medicine firm in Portland, Oregon, Mabel and Daisy are teachers in the Public School in Helena, Mont. Mintie is stenographer in the public institution at Hot Springs Mont., John D. conducts the ranch at Chinook. At that place the family has about 2600 acres of land. His wife is sister to his brother John's wife. He was very religious and a man of great energy.




STEPHEN BLACKSTONE


Stephen Blackstone was a son of Beverly and was born on the farm of his uncle John W. Blackstone, White Oak Spring, Wis. With his father he settled in McDonough Co. Ill. He grew up on the home farm with primitive opportunities for education. He was in his twenty third year when his father died. His sister Martha was already married and his mother, himself and sister Abba formed the household. In 1866 he married Mahala E. Smith. He followed the bent of his father dealing largely in live Stock and today a one thousand acre farm with splendid improvements attest his good judgment and industry.




MARTHA ANN BLACKSTONE


Martha Ann Blackstone was married to John White march 18, 1860 and settled in Nebraska in the neighborhood of Brunswick which is their Post Office address. She had led the life of a pioneer settle and four children came to this union, all of whom are now married




ABBA JANE BLACKSTONE


Abba Jane Blackstone is the daughter of Beverly Blackstone of McDonough Co., Ill Feb 10, 1869. She was married to Norris H. Johnston and moved to Nebraska. They are largely interested in farming. Their P. O. address is Curtis Nebraska.



EVERT BLACKSTONE


Evert Blackstone was born on the old Stephen Foot homestead in Madison Co., N.Y. He came west with his family and grew up in their new home at Millville, Ill. on his fathers death he remained on their home farm adding there to. He was locally prominent and represented his town several terms, on the county board of supervisors. He was there married to Alice Binns by whom he had three children, Nina Betty and Florence, the latter dying in infancy. His wife died Jan 14, 1897. He sold his farm and engaged in business in Warren Ill., making a home for himself and children with his sister Harriet Miller. He has remarried address Warren Ill.





HARRIET BLACKSTONE

Harriet Blackstone was born in Madison Co., N.Y. and settled in Millville Jo. Daviess Co., Ill. with the family. Feb. 4, 1873 she was united in marriage with Homer Miller and now making their home in Warren, Ill. Mr. Miller is a Veteran of the Civil War. They have no family. Address Warren Ill.





ANNA BLACKSTONE


Anna Blackstone was born at the home in York State. She married James Madison Irving of Apple River, Apr 4, 1855. Mr. Irving was a successful merchant. Of all the family there is none now surviving, except the son George Blackstone living, who is a Real Estate Dealer and Ranch Owner in Aztec, San Juan Co. New Mexico.




MARY BLACKSTONE


Mary Blackstone was born in Madison Co., NY. She came west with the family. Her Husband followed farming, but latter removed to Warren, Ill. and engaged in business. She was married to Mr. Emery and is the mother of a large family. Address Warren, Ill.




FRANK E. BLACKSTONE


Frank E. Blackstone was born on New York may 17, 1846. On Oct. 10, 1877 he was married to Nancy Emeline Handgrave. They have one daughter Hattie May Blackstone. He is a farmer by occupation. His Address is Stearns, Montana.




ELIZABETH J. BLACKSTONE


Elizabeth J. Blackstone was born at the home of her parents in Madison Co. N.Y. She was married to David A. Black, Oct. 29, 1854. A family of nine children followed this union. Mr. Black has long been in Commercial Pursuits in Chicago Ill. Their address is 959 S. Sawyer. ave., Chicago.




STEPHEN W. BLACKSTONE


Stephen W. Blackstone was born in Canada near Dundas with his father William he came to Wisconsin sometime in the sixties, and lived in the town of Monticello. As he grew up he went to live with his Grandfather until he grew to manhood. His people all having migrated to the vicinity of Chapin, Iowa, he went thither and followed farming, having married Harriet A. Simmons Nov 4, 1873. He then returned to Apple River, Ill and has there remained in business until the present time. His only unmarried daughter Nellie is Principle of a School in Lincoln Central Ill.




ELIZABETH A. BLACKSTONE


Elizabeth A. Blackstone, daughter of William returned to Canada and was there married to Joseph Ryan, Feb 17, 1874. There were two children Sarah Josephine and Eunice Augusta. Mr. Ryan died and she subsequently on the 23rd day of December 1896 married Samuel Atkin. She lived in Hamilton Canada which is her present P. O. Address at 64 Victoria Ave. Her second husband is now deceased.




SILANCE W. BLACKSTONE


Silance Ward Blackstone was married to Wm. H. Mcmillan Dec 24, 1874. Mr. McMillian carried on a large farm at Chapin, Iowa and was largely interested in breeding fine stock. He sold his land at Chapin and removed with his family to Topeka Kansas. Seven children followed this union, all of whom were unmarried at the last advises. There are five voters in the family. Address Topeka Kansas.

Since this was written Mr. McMillian has died.




CLARA BLACKSTONE


Clara Blackstone was born in Ontario, Canada June 13, 1842. She came west with the family and Dec. 25, 1864 was united in marriage with William Thompson Adams. Four children followed this union all of whom are now married. Mr. Adam followed farming in Monticello, Wis. until about the year 1870, when he removed to Chapin, Iowa and bought a large farm, which he conducted for many years. He is now, and has been for some years engaged in the grain trade, and is now County Treasurer. His Post Office Address is Chapin Iowa.




EDYTH P. BLACKSTONE


Edyth P. Blackstone is the daughter of Beverly Blackstone and Annie E. (Crossley) Blackstone. Her home is at Sioux City, Iowa and that is her P. O. Address. She was married to Everett J. Doolittle, Dec. 29, 1883. He is an Engineer.




WARREN W. BLACKSTONE


Warren W. Blackstone and Clara N. are the parents of three living children, Nellie Pearl, Earl Glenwood and Grace Leone. He is engaged in Warehouse Work and his Address is Ackley, Iowa.




MARY JANE BLACKSTONE


Mary Jane Blackstone, daughter of Beverly and Grand Daughter of Stephen Blackstone was married to Charles C. Abbott, Jan. 29,1881 and their P. O. Address is Sioux City, Iowa. Her mother is Annie E. (Crossley) Blackstone.




CHARLES S. BLACKSTONE.


Charles S. Blackstone was married to Jennie D. Castlow Nov 26, 1885. Clyde L. and Walter E. alone survive of this family of children. Chas S. resides at Lake Preston, S. Dakota. He is now dead.




CELINA E. DINGMAN.


Celina E. Dingman is the daughter of William Dingman and Sarah (Blackstone) Dingman. She was married to Silas W. Allen March 8, 1870. Seven children were born to this union only three of whom survive. P. O. Address Wathena, Kan. Their son R.E. Allen is a Practicing Physician at Doniphan, Doniphian Co., Kansas.




RACHEL BLACKSTONE


Rachel Blackstone married Marion Hamilton Dec 24, 1865. They have six children, three of whom are married. P. O. Address Chapin, Iowa.




EDGAR DINGMAN


He is great grandson of Stephen Foot Blackstone through Stephen Blackstone, and through Sarah Blackstone daughter of Stephen. His residence and his family are unknown.




WILLIAM VAN EVERY


William Van Every is the son of Harriet (Blackstone) Van Every and was married to Amina C. Williams Aug. 30, 1863. He is a farmer. They have a family living of seven children. P. O. Address Chapin, Iowa.




RAYMOND BLACKSTONE


Raymond Blackstone is the son of Beverly and Anne E. (Crossley) Blackstone, married to Rose A. Flure Nov, 4, 1873. They have five children, Leroy, Leslie, Lawrence, Anna and Raymond. P. O. Address Sioux City, Iowa.




SARAH JANE BLACKSTONE


Sarah Jane Blackstone is the daughter of William Blackstone and Eunice A. (Ryckman) Blackstone. She was born in Ontario, Canada was married to Chas Crossly Dec. 16, 1868. They have four children. P. O. Address 61 Kennard Block, Lincoln Nebraska.


KESIAH VAN EVERY


She was the daughter of Harriet (Blackstone) Van Every and Wm. Van Every. Married Wm. Reid. George Angus and Ada of their children survived. P. O. Address unknown.




DAVID E. VAN EVERY


David E. Van Every was the son of Harriet (Blackstone) Van Every and Wm. Van Every. He was married to Annie Goldsborough Aug. 30, 1872. Kattie M., George W., and Josephine are their children P. O. Address Chapin, Iowa.




LEAMON E. BLACKSTONE


Leamon E. Blackstone, son of William married Elizabeth Glinding, Feb 1880. Lived many years at Arlington, S.D. where he has a fine farm. On account of his health he moved to Grand Junction, Colorado where he conducted a successful business in manufacturing of cement. P. O. Address Grand Junction, Colorado.




MARGARET E. SMITH


She was the daughter of Anne (Blackstone) Smith and John C. Smith, was married to Abraham Bradshaw Dec. 31, 1859, Residence Ontario Canada. P. O. Address unknown.




JEANETTE BLACKSTONE


Daughter of Joseph Blackstone and Emma E. Blackstone married Wm. H. Look Sept. 18, 1888. Mr. Look is a Merchant runs cheese factory and is widely interested in Real Estate and many forms of business. They have two children, Frederick and Florence. P. O. Address Shullsburg, Wis.




CHARLES A. BECKWITH


Charles A. Beckwith is the son of Jeanette (Blackstone) Beckwith and H. A. Beckwith, was married to Ellen E. Woodworth in 1895. Beckwith has always been a Railroad Man, and was recently Dispatcher on the Milwaukee R.R. at Savanah Ill. Now of Byron Ill.




JOHN WILFORD BLACKSTONE


John Wilford Blackstone is the son of John W. Blackstone and Ellen E. (Hardy) Blackstone. Is Editor and Publisher of the Fredrick Star Polk Co., Wis. Married Isabel Blackstone July 24, 1900. He is the great grandson of Stephen Foot Blackstone through John Wilford. His wife is Great Great Grand Daughter through Stephen. P. O. Address Frederick, Wis.




ROCCEY BLACKSTONE


Roccey Blackstone is daughter of John W. Blackstone and Ellen E. (Hardy) Blackstone was educated at Platteville and Madison. Was marred to Ed S. Prince. Mr. Prince like his wife is of a very old New England stock. He was educated at the State Normal in Whitewater, Wis. He has followed Bookkeeping for many years and now is in the employ of the Great Implement House of Deere Webber & Co. P. O. Address 420 E. 16th St., Minneapolis, Minn.




LEROY D. BLACKSTONE


Leroy D. Blackstone is the son of Theodore E. and Mary E. (Hardy) Blackstone. He was graduated at the high school at Helena, Montana and afterward at the Law School at Ann Arbor, Michigan. He has a office in Chinook Montana. Was married Aug. 26, 1906to Sara McKibbon. Address Chinook, Montana.




HARRY R. BLACKSTONE


Harry R. Blackstone is the son of Theodore E. and Mary E. (Hardy) Blackstone. Has followed Railroading all his life and is now Claim Clerk and Adjuster in the Burlington office at Aurora, Ill. Was married to Myrtle Whitters Dec. 20, 1890. They have one son, Elmer R. Post Office Address Burlington General Office Aurora Ill.




JOSEPHINE E. BLACKSTONE


Josephine E. Blackstone is the daughter of Theodore E. and Mary E. Blackstone. Her husband is Herbert Wescott, son of the Master Mechanic of the Great Northern R.R. Address Helena, Mont.




CATHERINE I. BLACKSTONE


Daughter of Theodore E. and Mary E. (Hardy) Blackstone. Her home is in Seattle, Washington. Her husband is James H. Gilpatrick son of Collins Gilpatrick, first settler in Helena Montana. They have three girls. Address Seattle, Washington.




BLANCHE B. BECKWITH


Daughter of Henry A. Beckwith and Jeanette (Blackstone) Beckwith; was married to Rufus L. Dutcher, June 8, 1903. He is engaged in Dairying. They have a son P. O. Address White Oak ,Wis.




ANNA ETHNEL BECKWITH

Daughter of H. A. and Jeanette (Blackstone) Beckwith married to Joseph Metcalf. Are Farmers P. O. Address Shullsburg, Wis.




ADELBERT L. BLACKSTONE


He is the son of Augustus Blackstone was born on the old homestead in White Oak Spring, Wis. Graduated at the High School in Shullsburg, Wis. Later attended Northern Ill. Normal and Business College; was graduated from Law Department of Wis. University in 1897. Practices Law in Waukesha at the present time. Married Maude Ann Everett Oct 9, 1901. She graduated from Carroll College, Waukesha in 1893. She graduated from Ferry Hall, Lake Forest, Ill. in 1898.




BERTRAM A. BLACKSTONE


Bertram A. Blackstone was born at the old Blackstone homestead in White Oak Springs. He is the son of Augustus Blackstone and grand son of John W. Blackstone. Was educated at the high school at Shullsburg, Wis. He learned the Photographic Art when young and followed it some years. Later he went to Chicago and became a pupil of the noted Cartoonist McCutcheon. He is at present engaged in different lines of drawing and sketching, and illustrating books and catalogues. Address 488 West Monroe St., Chicago, Ill.




HERBERT LEE BLACKSTONE


Herbert Lee Blackstone is the son of Joseph and Emma E. Blackstone. He has always followed railroading, and is now Station Agent and freight solicitor for the Great Northern at Fernie, Canada. His wife is Bertha Freda (Bauman) Blackstone of Minneapolis. They were married June 9, 1901.




WILFORD R. BLACKSTONE


Wilford R. Blackstone is the son of Joseph and Emma E. Blackstone. He was born in the town of White Oak Spring, and educated at the high school at Shullsburg, Wis. He attended Dental College at Atlanta, Georgia and received his diploma. He married Effie Thompson Aug. 23, 1900. They have two boys. He has a large and lucrative practice. P. O. Address Shullsburg, Wis.




EVA M. BLACKSTONE


Eva (Blackstone) Kruger is the daughter of Joseph, son of John W. Blackstone of White Oak Spring, Wis. Graduate of Shullsburg High School, was a manager of the Mercantile Business of W.H. Look. Her husband is engaged in the Stock Business at Apple River Ill., which is their P. O. Address.




CHARLES E. JOHNSTON


He is the son of Abba Jane, and grandson of Beverly Blackstone. He was married to Ella M. Barry July 9, 1899.




MALISSA WHITE


Daughter of Martha Ann White and Grand Daughter of Beverly Blackstone, was married to Samuel Puryear Sept.28, 1882. One child survives. P. O. Address Carson, Iowa.




MARY WHITE


Mary White is the daughter of Martha Ann (Blackstone) White. She was married to O.M. Olsen Mar. 28, 1897. They have one son, Arlean White born Nov. 16, 1899.




WILFORD B. WHITE


He is the son of Martha Ann (Blackstone) White, and Grandson of Beverly Blackstone. He was married July 1, 1900. One child was born. The mother died at it Birth. The child died soon afterwards.




GEORGE R. BLACKSTONE


George R. Blackstone is the son of Stephen Blackstone and grandson of Beverly. He was married to Olive Smith June 12, 1900. He is engaged in merchandizing at Pennington Point, Ill.




NETTIE G. BLACKSTONE


Daughter of Stephen Blackstone. Was married to J.W. Ferris May 23, 1900.




BEVERLY BLACKSTONE


Grandson of Beverly Blackstone and son of Stephen. Married Maud Sholl Sept. 30, 1897. Residence Pennington Point, McDonough, Ill.




SARAH L. JOHNSTON


Daughter of Abba Jane (Blackstone) Johnston, married to John A. Cushing March 2, 1894. Have two children Ella J. and Morris P.




PHOEBE WHITE


Daughter of Martha Ann (Blackstone) White. Was married to Herbert Puryear Oct. 26, 1880. They have four children, Pearl, Hazle, John and Grace.




DORA BELL (BLACK) RICHARDSON


Dora Bell (Black) Richardson is the daughter of David A. Black and of Elizabeth Jane (Blackstone) Black. They have two children. Mr. Richardson was born in Chicago. He is Manufacturer of Tools. Their residence and P. O. Address is 1111 16 Street, Rock Island, Ill.




BESSIE H. (BLACK) GRAY


Bessie H. (Black) Gray is the daughter of David A. Black and Elizabeth (Blackstone) Black, and grand daughter of Franklin Blackstone.

Jessie A. Gray is European agent of the Brickmore Medicine Co. He was born at the Old Town Maine, which is his Post Office Address.




SYLVIA M. BLACK


Is the daughter of Elizabeth Jane (Blackstone) and David A. Black. Granddaughter of Franklin Blackstone. Married to John V. Byrne 1892. Has five children. P. O. Address 1347, 74th Street Brooklyn, N.Y.




TANJOR T. BLACK


Son of Betty (Blackstone) Black and David A. Black, Grandson of Franklin Blackstone and Great Grandson of Stephen Foot Blackstone. He was born at Apple River, Ill, moved to Chicago in 1862, to Missouri in 1868, to Montana 1882 and lived there since. Taught school about 20 years. Engaged in Agriculture and Horticulture. Member State Board of Horticulture, and framers Institute Corps. Family all Methodist and good Templars.




FANNIE G. HAMILTON


Daughter of Rachel Blackstone and granddaughter of William. Was married March 1, 1897 to Harry R. Davenport. Have one child, George Claire. Address Chapin, Iowa.




FRED A. CROSSLEY


Grandson of William Blackstone through Sarah Jane. Was Married to Edith J. Young June 8, 1896. Have two sons, Fred R. and Wm. Allen. Address Lincoln, Neb.




WILLIAM E. VAN EVERY


Grandson of Harriet (Blackstone) Van Every was married to Elizabeth Selix Oct. 7, 1893. They have three children, Walter, Fern and Elgie. P. O. Address, Chapin, Iowa.




MARY O. HAMILTON


Daughter of Rachel Blackstone, granddaughter of William was married to Charles A. Little Dec. 12, 1893. Have one child, Sheily Trelour.




JOHN Q. ADAMS


John Q. Adams is the son of Clara M. (Blackstone) Adams and grandson of William Blackstone. He was married May 28, 1896 to Cecelia F. Palanch at Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He is practicing Attorney and is located at Flandreau, Moody Co., South Dakota. He has been twice States Attorney for Moody Co. They have one child, Lillian F. P. O. Address is Flandreau, S.D.




GEORGE W. ADAMS


George W. Adams is the son of Clara M. (Blackstone) Adams, and Grandson of William Blackstone. He is Attorney and Counselor at Law and is located at Estherville, Iowa. He was married Feb. 20, 1896 at Los Angeles, Cal. To Iva E. Binford, who was born at Marshalltown, Iowa Dec. 1, 1871. They have two children, Florence E. and Katheryn B. P. O. Address Estherville, Iowa.




HARRIET VAN EVERY


Granddaughter of Harriet (Blackstone) Van Every, was married to Fred B. Hill in 1895. They have three children, Bryan C., David P. and Margarite. Address Chapin, Iowa.




GEORGE W. VAN EVERY


Grandson of Harriet (Blackstone) Van Every. He was married to Elizabeth C. Crawford Oct. 22, 1892.




JOSEPHINE VAN EVERY


Granddaughter of Harriet (Blackstone) Van Every. She was married to J. L. W. Hazelton about 1898. They have one child born May 6, 1900, Manon E. Hazelton. P. O. Address Cuba City, Wis.




GEORGE W. VAN EVERY


Grandson of Harriet (Blackstone) Van Every, was married to Emma DeMars, Oct. 22, 1892. They have three children, Lottie, Glen and Olive. Address Chapin, Iowa.




EMERY VAN EVERY


Grandson of Harriet (Blackstone) Van Every, born Apr. 8, 1875, was married to Emma Vanston, July 9, 1898. They have one child, Clinton.




LLOYD BLACKSTONE


Lloyd Blackstone is the son of Leamon Blackstone now of Grand Junction, Colorado. He married Inez Hall 1893. Stella Mae is their only child. Inez Hall is a direct descendant of David Williams who with Isaac Van Wert and John Paulding captured Major Andre.




SARAH HELEN CROSSLEY


Sarah Helen Crossley is the granddaughter of William, eldest son of Stephen Blackstone. She was married to Charles E. Kolf Nov. 21, 1900. Address Lincoln, Neb.




GUSSIE HAMILTON


Daughter of Rachel Blackstone, and granddaughter of William, was married to Chas C. Minor, Feb. 1, 1893. They have one son, Scott Hamilton. Address Chapin, Iowa.




LEONE BLACKSTONE


Leone Blackstone, daughter of Stephen and Grand Daughter of William was born at Chapin, Iowa Nov. 18, 1876. Moved with her father to Apple River, Ill, and married to William Finegan, Jan 4, 1900. Address Apple River, Ill.




ISABEL BLACKSTONE


She is great great granddaughter of Stephen Foot Blackstone through his son Stephen. Was married to John Wilford Blackstone, great grandson of Stephen Foot Blackstone through his son John Wilford Blackstone. Address Frederick, Wis.




CLARA JOSEPHINE ADAMS


She is the daughter of Wm. T. Adams and Clara M. (Blackstone) Adams. Great Great Grand Daughter of Stephen Foot Blackstone. She was born at the town of Monticello, Wis. Her husband is George McChurehouse, born in FonDulac Wis. They have one daughter, born at Kanawha, Hancock Co., Iowa, Dec. 24, 1904.




ADA BLACKSTONE


Ada Blackstone is the youngest daughter of Stephen Blackstone and great great grandaughter of Stephen Foot Blackstone. She was married Sept. 27, 1905 to Augustus Stephens of Scales Mound, which is their P. O. Address. They are merchants.




SAMUEL L. BLACKSTONE


Son of Joseph Blackstone and Mary E. (Poole) Blackstone, Grandson of John W. Blackstone, and was born in White Oak Spring, Wis. Has always followed Railroading. Has two sons, Joseph and Kendall. He is now located at Allen, Neb., on the line of the Great Northern Railway. Address Allen, Neb.




CLYDE L. BLACKSTONE


He is the son of Charles, who was the son of Edward, who was the son of Stephen, who was the son of Stephen Foot Blackstone. Was married Nov. 26, 1906 to Beulah Frances Wilde. Is Freight conductor on H & D Division, C. M. & St. Paul R. R. Lives at Milbank, S.D. which is his Post Office Address.



Corrections page and INDEX TO PART FIRST & SECOND



James R. Dangel
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